Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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The WFR-Chem model can produce valuable smoke emissions and fire spread information along with up to a 72 hour smoke forecast. This model can be used by fire and resouce managers, city and borough personnel and others. Feedback is needed for improved...

Person: Steufer
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'Wildland fire managers face increasingly steep challenges to meet air quality standards while planning prescribed fire and its inevitable smoke emissions. The goals of sound fire management practices, including fuel load...

Person: LeQuire, Hunter
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Robinson
Year: 1989
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Williams
Year: 1989
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Riebau, Sestak
Year: 1989
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The expanding use of prescribed fire to achieve North American land management objectives has led, in recent years, to the increased use of helicopter-ignition, large-scale controlled burns. These mass-ignition convection burns often generate extremely...

Person: Lawson, Hawkes, Dalrymple, Stocks
Year: 1989
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

States in the humid southeastern US (ex. Louisiana, South Carolina) are investigating or already implementing a methodology developed in the arid intermountain west where particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5...

Person: Broughton, Lahm, Fitch, O'Neill
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Managers, regulators, and others often need information on the emissions from wildland fire and their expected smoke impacts. In order to create this information, combinations of models are utilized. The modeling steps follow a logical progression from...

Person: Larkin, Strand, Drury, Raffuse, Solomon, O'Neill, Wheeler, Huang, Rorig, Hafner
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Plume injection height influences plume transport characteristics, such as range and potential for dilution. We evaluated plume injection height from a predictive wildland fire smoke transport model over the contiguous United States (U.S.) from 2006 to...

Person: Raffuse, Craig, Larkin, Strand, Sullivan, Wheeler, Solomon
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fire managers face increasingly steep challenges to meet air quality standards while planning prescribed fire and its inevitable smoke emissions. The goals of sound fire management practices, including fuel load reduction through prescribed...

Person:
Year: 2012
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES