Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 576

The Kenai Lake Fire burned north of Kenai Lake on the Seward Ranger District of the Chugach National Forest from June 25 through July 8, 2001. The fire’s size was approximately 3260 acres. This assessment uses the FireFamily+ and RERAP (Rare Event Risk...

Person: Sorbel
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Here, in one concise book, is the essential story of fire. Noted environmental historian Stephen J. Pyne describes the evolution of fire through prehistoric and historic times down to the present, examining contemporary attitudes from a long-range,...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The thrilling story of the most important firefighting efforts in the last 100 years as told by fire expert Stephen Pyne. Pyne relates the similarities between the vast fires of summer 2000 with the Great Fires of 1910 that swept across the northwest,...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Pine-lichen woodlands in north-central British Columbia show a long period of successional development where reindeer lichens (Cladina spp.) dominate plant cover at the forest floor surface. However, in mid- to late-successional stands lichen cover is...

Person: Sulyma, Coxson
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A plethora of new concepts for managing production forests so as to preserve biodiversity have found their way into management procedures without much testing to make them most effective. The general framework for a new approach has, in most regions,...

Person: Simberloff
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Conservation easements are a voluntary, incentive-based approach to recognizing the public benefits provided by private forests. The land stays in private ownership and in productive use, while key 'conservation values...

Person: Best
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The 1988 fire season showed us much about the importance of basing decisions on fire regimes and their associated fire behavior characteristics. Although our policies are necessarily broad, we are learnng that implementation of...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Williams
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'The Canadian Parks Service has a fire management policy that is best described as evolving. The development history of the fire policy and current practices have been reviewed by other authors (Lopoukhine, 1993; Westhaver, 1992...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Woodley
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Decision making for managers in a fire situation can be very complicated. The information brought to the decision maker must be well though out and accurate. Before meaningful strategy can be formulated, realistic agreed-upon objectives for the...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Poncin
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

What we call wilderness fire is the merger, collision, mixture, alliance, confrontation, and altogether curious and perplexing association of two very different traditions. One is nature preservation, particularly as expressed in wilderness; the other...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Pyne
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS