Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Wildland fuel characteristics are used in many applications of operational fire predictions and to understand fire effects and behaviour. Even so, there is a shortage of information on basic fuel properties and the physical characteristics of wildland...

Person: Riccardi, Prichard, Sandberg, Ottmar
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The primary objective of the Emission Production Model project is: To improve the usability, accuracy, and applicability of an Emission Production Model to predict air pollutant source strength, heat release rate, and plume buoyancy from all fire...

Person: Sandberg, Alvarado, Ferguson, Leuschen, McKenzie, O'Neill, Ottmar, Peterson, Acheson, Brenner, Fisher, Lahm, Peterson, Riebau, Russell, Schaaf
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires are a natural, reoccurring, and essential component of ecological communities worldwide. Decades of fire exclusion and altered fire regimes have had substantial ecological consequences, including increased fuel loads. Fuel loads are diverse...

Person: Riccardi, Prichard, Ottmar, Sandberg
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

The ongoing development of sophisticated fire behavior and effects models has demonstrated the need for a comprehensive system of fuel classification that more accurately captures the structural complexity and geographic diversity of fuelbeds. The...

Person: Sandberg, Ottmar, Cushon
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Wildland fuelbed characteristics are temporally and spatially complex and can vary widely across regions. To capture this variability, we designed the Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS), a national system to create fuelbeds and classify...

Person: Riccardi, Ottmar, Sandberg, Andreu, Elman, Kopper, Long
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fuel characteristics are used in many applications of operational fire predictions and to understand fire effects and behaviour. Even so, there is a shortage of information on basic fuel properties and the physical characteristics of wildland...

Person: Riccardi, Prichard, Sandberg, Ottmar
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We present an overview of the Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS), a tool that enables land managers, regulators, and scientists to create and catalogue fuelbeds and to classify those fuelbeds for their capacity to support fire and consume...

Person: Ottmar, Sandberg, Riccardi, Prichard
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Project Objectives For at least 5 different major classes of fuels typically involved in residual smoldering combustion (RSC) and two different moisture content conditions dispersed over at least 10 different sites. Four of these will be in the western...

Person: Hao, Babbitt, Ferguson, Lahm, Ottmar, Sandberg, Susott, Yokelson
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Wildfires represent one of the most common disturbances in boreal regions, and have the potential to reduce C, N, and Hg stocks in soils while contributing to atmospheric emissions. Organic soil layers of the forest floor were sampled before and after...

Person: Harden, Neff, Sandberg, Turetsky, Ottmar, Gleixner, Fries, Manies
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES