Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 81 - 90 of 420

A conceptual ecosystem model illustrates principles of ecosystem management in wetlands. Wetlands are excellent systems for the development of ecosystem management principles because they are relatively simple ecosystems and respond quickly to changes...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Lugo
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Surface fires in wetland ecosystems frequently ignite smoldering ground fires. Ground fires often create and maintain open, shallow marshes that contribute to ecosystem diversity. Fire exclusion, drainage, deforestation, and other human activities have...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Hungerford, Frandsen, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Red Bench Fire of 1988 was the most significant fire to occur within the North Fork of the Flathead River drainage since 1926. Several wet sedge meadows were burned within Glacier National Park. To determine the effects of fire on vegetation...

Person: Cerulean, Engstrom, Willard, Wakimoto, Ryan
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The results of a study using satellite imagery to map boreal forest fires in Alaska in 1990 and 1991 are presented. Composite AVHRR data was found to detect more than 80% of fires greater than 2,000 ha in size Addidonally, using a two season method, 78...

Person: French, Kasischke, Bourgeau-Chavez, Berry
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

As part of the development of a model for predicting fuel loading reductions by and intensity histories of fires burning in large woody natural fuels, it was necessary to develop separate models for the processes of ignition and rate of burning of...

Person: Albini, Reinhardt
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss.), an introduced perennial grass is an aggressive invader of prairie dominated by plains rough fescue (Festuca altaica Trin. subsp. hallii [Vasey] Harms). We (1) compared richness and density of plant species in brome...

Person: Grilz, Romo
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A fire regime classification that recognizes stand-replacement, nonlethal understory, mixed and variable fire severities is discussed as a simplified approach for communicating widely about the natural role of fire. Examples of the fire regime types...

Person: Brown
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire burns 3,000-1,000,000 acres annually, It is a natural part of the ecology of the boreal forest of interior Alaska. Fire alters the site, growing conditions on the site, site resilency, and the habitat of users of the site. It promotes site...

Person: Foote
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A graph has been constructed for determining one of five possible head fire intensity classes as well as the general type of fire (i.e., surface,intermittent crown or continuous crown) for Canadian Forest Fire Behavior Prediction System Fuel Type C-2 F...

Person: Alexander, Cole
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'Statement by the Chief of the Forest Service United States Department of Agriculture, before the Subcommittee on Agricultural Research, Conservation, Forestry, and General Legislation Committee on Agriculture, United States Senate.'

Person: Thomas
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS