Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 61 - 70 of 227

Breeding populations of the fire-adapted carabid-beetle A. quadripunctatum were found in most of the fifteen investigated burned, uncut forests, but not in any of the fifteen burned clear-cuts, although a few immigrants were found in two of them. The...

Person: Wikars
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text..'Twenty, 62-acre study sites were located within a creosote-tarbush habitat on McGregor Range, Fort Bliss in south central New Mexico. Prescribed fires were applied to 10 of the study sites during June 1995. Reptile and terrestrial...

Person: Vogel, Demarais
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'We are studying the response of the vegetation and small mammal communities to a prescribed burn to make training and land management recommendations to the military. Twenty study sites (63 acres each) in a creosote/tarbush...

Person: Monasmith, Demarais
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ring-width chronologies from three white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and two jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) sites in the boreal forest of northern Alberta were constructed to determine whether they could provide proxy records of monthly...

Person: Larsen, Macdonald
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ecosystem management links human activities with the functioning of natural environments over large spatial and temporal scales. Our examination of Greater Yellowstone and Georges Bank shows similarities exist between human uses, administrative...

Person: Burroughs, Clark
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Greater Yellowstone is described as the last large, nearly intact ecosystem in the northern temperate zone of the earth (Reese 1984;Keiter and Boyce 1991.) Conflict over management has been controversial, and the area is a flagship site among...

Person: LaRoe, Schullery
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'The forests that burned in the 1988 Yellowstone fires appear by all indicators to be perfectly healthy. We should place a premium on the protection of large preserves where nature can manage her own affairs.'

Person: Anderson
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'After years of suppressing forest fires, the Park Service is realizing its policy does not necessarily benefit ecosystems that depend on intense blazes for regeneration.'

Person: Wuerthner
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire managers base a growing number of decisions on information from a variety of computer systems.

Person: Calvin
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

FIRE! is one example of GIS models that go beyond inventory, monitoring, and display to allow ecosystem managers to simulate the spatial outcomes of management and policy decisions. By making the ability to vary critical model assumptions readily...

Person: Green, Finney, Campbell, Weinstein, Landrum
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS