Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Decision making for managers in a fire situation can be very complicated. The information brought to the decision maker must be well though out and accurate. Before meaningful strategy can be formulated, realistic agreed-upon objectives for the...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Poncin
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The statement, 'Availability of fire resources can be a serious constraint to conducting prescribed natural fire activities,' illustrates some misunderstanding of prescribed fire programs. The availability of fire suppression resources should...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Stauber
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Resource management plans and objectives may be sound ecologically and within agency mandates for management, but impossible to expedite because of political considerations and obstacles. It is imperative that these be recognized in the planning...

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Hurd
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed natural fire programs in the National Park Service have changed dramatically following the 1988 Yellowstone fires. The area burned per year has declined by 94 percent even though the area within prescribed natural fire zones has increased....

Person: Brown, Mutch, Weatherspoon, Wakimoto, Botti, Nichols
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fire records 1914 - 1968, for Kamloops and Nelson Forest Districts in British Columbia are summarized to indicate trends in costs and damage. Areas burned have been substantially reduced by improved fire control techniques and intensity....

Person: Smith, Henderson
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'But we must be concerned with all the products of our forest lands and the successful forest manager will be aware of the tools and techniques that optimize integrated uses. This must be done in the long range view. Thus, we must...

Person: McDowell
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'Let me over-simplify (or overstate) my argument to make my point. Foresters have tended to identify only two types of fires: (1) wildfires, which are bad and should be prevented or put out expeditiously, and (2) prescribed fires,...

Person: Wambach
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'Management today is faced with getting more jobs done at a relatively constant fund level in a period of inflationary costs and growing environmental concern,. this gives rise to the practice known as 'looking at one's...

Person: Robinson
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text: 'I want to stress one last point. Equipment developers, such as my organization, need your cooperation in defining or, more importantly, identifying your major problems. You, Fire Control managers, have the field problems which must...

Person: Burbank
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Costs and effectiveness of fire control, need for hazard reduction, slash disposal policy, history of slash burning, opportunities for prescribed burning, as well as fire effects, costs and benefits are described breifly. Most attention is given to the...

Person: Smith
Year: 1970
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS