Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is possible to delimit the areas of the North, Central, and South America that are most susceptible to fire and would have been most affected by burning practices of early Americans. Areas amounting to approximately 155 x 105 km² are here designated...

Person: Woodcock, Wells
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The capture of fire by the genus Homo changed forever the natural history of the Earth. Even today fire appears at the core of many popular scenarios for an environmental apocalypse. Yet the larger history of fire - the varied ways human society have...

Person: Pyne
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire as a major evolutionary force has been disputed because it is considered to lack supporting evidence. If a trait has evolved in response to selection by fire then the environment of the plant must have been fire-prone before the appearance of that...

Person: Lamont, He
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[from the text] Much like the proverbial chicken and egg story, there is debate over whether fire or the adaptations to fire came first for plant species in fire-prone ecosystems. This is significant because if the fire-prone habitats came first, it...

Person: Keeley, Witter, van Mantgem
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES