Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Summary (p.499-500) ... 'Fire is an important natural and anthropogenic factor in the dynamics of the boreal forest system. The ecological and environmental impacts of boreal fires depend on fire weather, fuel availability, fire behavior and...

Person: Angelstam
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Telfer
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Moody, Buchanan, Melcher, Wistrand
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Studies of anticipated effects of global warming tend to concentrate on the physiological limits of individual organisms, and imputed modifications to biome distributions expresed as climax ecosystems. Changes in distributions of individual species and...

Person: Holten, Paulsen, Oechel, Suffling
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Created through the Wildfire Disaster Recovery Act of 1989 (PL 101-286), in response to the destructive western fire season of 1987 and the Yellowstone fires of 1988, the Commission was asked to consider the environmental and economic effects of...

Person:
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is possible to delimit the areas of the North, Central, and South America that are most susceptible to fire and would have been most affected by burning practices of early Americans. Areas amounting to approximately 155 x 105 km² are here designated...

Person: Woodcock, Wells
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The capture of fire by the genus Homo changed forever the natural history of the Earth. Even today fire appears at the core of many popular scenarios for an environmental apocalypse. Yet the larger history of fire - the varied ways human society have...

Person: Pyne
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Changing climate and land use appear to importantly affect the biosphere by way of impacts on fire regimes. Feedback effects on climate and air quality are likely through emissions of trace gases, aerosols, and particulates that affect radiation...

Person: Clark, Stocks
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1 The postglacial history of jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) at its northernmost distribution limit in the upper boreal forest, along the Grande Riviere de la Baleine (northern Quebec), was reconstructed by using radiocarbon-dated conifer...

Person: Desponts, Payette
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

1. Pollen analysis of sediment cores from the four zones that comprise the forest-tundra transition in northern Quebec provide a history of the vegetation that can be compared with extensive macrofossil data from the region. Basal radiocarbon dates...

Person: Gajewski, Payette, Ritchie
Year: 1993
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS