Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Identifying communities vulnerable to adverse health effects from exposure to wildfire smoke may help prepare responses, increase the resilience to smoke and improve public health outcomes during smoke days. We developed a Community Health-...

Person: Rappold, Reyes, Pouliot, Cascio, Diaz-Sanchez
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This webinar presented by Wayne Cascio June 21, 2017 highlighted updates to the Wildfire Smoke Guide, as well as the Smoke Sense app, which is a mobile application that gets air quality information to people impacted by wildfire smoke, and helps those...

Person: Cascio
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Recent growth in the frequency and severity of US wildfires has led to more wildfire smoke and increased public exposure to harmful air pollutants. Populations exposed to wildfire smoke experience a variety of negative health impacts, imposing economic...

Person: Jones, Berrens
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire smoke is a complex mixture of air contaminants that have the potential cause adverse health effects. Individuals can be exposed occupationally if they work as wildland firefighters or public exposure from ambient air that is contaminated...

Person: Domitrovich, Broyles, Ottmar, Reinhardt, Naeher, Kleinman, Navarro, Mackay, Adetona
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fires are increasing in frequency, size and intensity partly due to climate change and land management practices, yet there is limited knowledge of the impacts of smoke emissions - both short term and long term. EPA is using its expertise in air...

Person: Brown
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

In summary, the toxicological and epidemiological evidence of adverse effects for those with chronic exposure to smoke is troubling, especially so for those with preexisting cardiovascular health conditions. What the research means for healthy workers...

Person: Domitrovich, Ottmar
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Smoke from wildland fires has a significant impact on public health and transportation safety and presents a serious complication for air regulators seeking to design effective and efficient emission control strategies to meet and maintain air quality...

Person: Urbanski
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Exposure to smoke emitted from wildfire and planned burns (i.e., smoke events) has been associated with numerous negative health outcomes, including respiratory symptoms and conditions. This rapid review investigates recent evidence (post-2009)...

Person: Fish, Peters, Ramsey, Sharplin, Corsini, Eckert
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Kris Ray from the Air Quality Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation presented his experience monitoring indoor air quality during the 2015 wildfire season, and Dr. Shelly Miller from the University of Colorado shared her...

Person: Ray, Miller
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Vyas, Hill, Larson, Poulton
Year: 1994
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES