Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 254

The Minimum Acceptable Visibility (MAV) table was originally provided by the California Highway Patrol in response to an inquiry  relative to acceptable highway visibility reduction caused by smoke. The table was included in chapter two of the 1991...

Person:
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Surface fire intensity (kilowatts per metre) and crown fire initiation were predicted using Rothermel's 1972 and Van Wagner's 1977 fire models with fuel data from 47 upland subalpine conifer stands (comprising Pinus contorta var. latifolia,...

Person: Bessie, Johnson
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A computer simulation model, FARSITE, includes existing fire behavior models for surface, crown, spotting, point-source fire acceleration, and fuel moisture. The model’s components and assumptions are documented. Simulations were run for simple...

Person: Finney
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We develop a potentially generalizable cost estimation procedure for fuels treatment using the National Park Service (NPS) nationwide database. The NPS database includes records on the projected cost of fuel treatment projects. These records are kept...

Person: Rideout, Omi
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From ancient philosophies to present day science, the ubiquity of change and the process of transformation are core concepts. The primary focus of a recent white paper on disturbance ecology is summed up by the Greek philosopher Heraclitus who stated...

Person: Eskew, Saveland
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

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Person: Turner, Dale
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We review and compare well-studied examples of five large, infrequent disturbances (LIDs)-fire, hurricanes, tornadoes, volcanic eruptions, and floods-in terms of the physical processes involved, the damage patterns they create in forested landscapes,...

Person: Foster, Knight, Franklin
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Disturbance events vary in intensity, size, and frequency, but few opportunities exist to study those that are extreme on more than one of these gradients. This article characterizes successional processes that occur following infrequent disturbance...

Person: Turner, Baker, Peterson, Peet
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a prevalent natural disturbance in most of British Columbia's forest ecosystems. Recently, scientists and forest managers have recognized the important role fire plays in regulating forest ecosystems and maintaining biodiversity. In...

Person: Fall
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Over the past twenty years, risk communication researchers and practitioners have learned some lessons, often at considerable personal price. For the most part, the mistakes that they have made have been natural, even intelligent ones. As a result, the...

Person: Fischoff
Year: 1995
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES