Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 24

The increasing incidence, extent and severity of uncontrolled burning globally, together with its many adverse consequences, has brought fire into the international environmental policy arena, with growing calls for international action leading to...

Person: Goldammer
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Jemez Mountains Project is a part of the North American Fire Learning Network (FLN), a collaborative venture of the USDA Forest Service, the Department of the Interior and The Nature Conservancy. Project partners include Bandelier National Monument...

Person: McCarthy, Wood
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Ferguson, Elkie
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper presents preliminary results of an effort to assess impacts caused by forest fires on regional air quality and visibility. Regional air quality is the result of many, many different sources of air pollution being transported, dispersed,...

Person: Barna, Fox
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

BlueSky is a real-time smoke forecast system that predicts surface smoke concentrations from prescribed fire, wildfire, and agricultural burn activities. Developed by the USDA Forest Service in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency (...

Person: O'Neill, Ferguson, Peterson, Wilson
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Modern fire suppression has the potential to alter the natural distribution of forest cover types and age classes, which has consequences for resource management. A 21,000 ha prescribed burn to enhance wildlife habitat and secondarily reduce continuity...

Person: Paragi, Smart, Worum, Haggstrom
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

FireSmart forest management strategies often include landscape level fuel treatments that fragment the landscape to reduce the risk of extreme fire events. We describe a decision support system that is being developed for incorporating FireSmart forest...

Person: Espinoza, Cui, Martell
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Members of two caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) herds periodically winter in lichen habitat on the Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in north central Alaska, providing an important subsistence resource for residents of nearby villages. Fire is...

Person: Morton
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The ongoing development of sophisticated fire behavior, fire effects, and carbon balance models and the implementation of large landscape assessments has demonstrated the need for a comprehensive system of fuelbed classification that more accurately...

Person: Ottmar, Sandberg, Prichard, Riccardi
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The surveillance of critical facilities and national infrastructure such as forests, waterways, roadways, pipelines and utilities requires advanced technological tools to provide timely, up to date information on status and threats. Unmanned Aerial...

Person: Wegener
Year: 2003
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS