Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18

From the text ...'This paper summarizes results of a study conducted under the aegis of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. We report on a midscale scientific assessment of vegetation change in terrestrial landscapes of the...

Person: Hessburg, Smith
Year: 1999
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The high variablility of burning conditions and fuels, found in Alaskan forest fires, produces an associated complex emission of particulate matter. Histological evidence of some large particles has been found in the forest fire plumes as well as...

Person: Eaton, Wendler
Year: 1983
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Hall, Ormsby, Johnson, Brown
Year: 1980
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The Forest Service's Fire Adapted Communities (FAC) program invests in a wide range of partnerships and programs to promote the mitigation of wildfire threats and impacts to communities. FAC supports Firewise Communities/USA; Ready, Set, Go!; and...

Person: Goulette, Decker, Medley-Daniel, Goldstein
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Whether you are at the town, county, or regional level, identifying and bringing together the proper players in wildland-fire preparedness can be a challenge. Each player has an important role in preparedness, and each brings both benefits and unique...

Person: Deaton
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Presented at the CFFDRS in Alaska Summit – October 28-30, 2014 Fort Wainwright, AK.

Person: Fronterhouse
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

While some scientists may view Twitter as a social media fad, we argue that it can be a powerful tool to deliver conservation messages to a wide audience.

Person: Parsons, Shiffman, Darling, Spillman, Wright
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This report is a deliverable to share the impact of travel funding awarded by the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) in support of a workshop focused on fire-prone coupled human and natural systems (CHANS). From August 4th-7th 2014, twenty-six...

Person: Olsen, Spies, Shindler
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildland fires have increased in extent and severity in recent years. At the same time, the number of people living in harm's way has increased dramatically. This has not only resulted in more people and private property potentially at risk from...

Person: Fischer, Toman, Olsen
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

With more people than ever living in the vicinity of the wildland-urban interface, communicating wildland fire management activities and building trust with the public is paramount for safety. Although the time and resources it takes to build and...

Person:
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES