Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 187

The Minimum Acceptable Visibility (MAV) table was originally provided by the California Highway Patrol in response to an inquiry  relative to acceptable highway visibility reduction caused by smoke. The table was included in chapter two of the 1991...

Person:
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[no description entered]

Person: Anderson
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The forecast skill of the National Meteorological Center's medium range forecast (MRF) numerical forecasts of fire weather variables is assessed for the period June 1, 1988 to May 31, 1990. Near-surface virtual temperature, relative humidity, wind...

Person: Roads, Ueyoshi, Chen, Alpert, Fujioka
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Modelling of the wind effect on the rate of spread of a flame in a forest fire usually employs a wind velocity measured at mid-flame height. An alternative formulation is proposed in this paper, based on the wall shear-stress produced by the wind on...

Person: Viegas, Neto
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Smoldering ground fires can raise mineral soil temperatures above 300°C for several hours with peak temperatures near 600°C. Such temperatures can result in the decomposition of organic material and kill important soil organisms. The heat evolved per...

Person: Frandsen
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Redmann
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper looks first at the kind of forest fire statistics that are currently available in Canada. The main statistics are number of fires area burned, causes, and control costs. Good inventory data on burned areas are not available. The recent...

Person: Brand, Van Wagner
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text: 'In this concluding chapter, therefore, we try to put these Greater Yellowstone developments in perspective. We begin by identifying the principal conflicts involved in this transition to an ecosystem-based management policy in...

Person: Keiter, Boyce, Keiter, Boyce
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This is a review of the essential ingredients needed to make a mathematical model of fire spread through a fuel bed. The physical problem is outlined in general terms. Previous models are classified as statistical, empirical, or physical in accordance...

Person: Weber
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The tables presented here contain forest fire statistics for the calendar year 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987 as reported by all Canadian forest fire control agencies. The statistical data are presented separately for each province or other major...

Person: Ramsey, Higgins
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS