Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 39

Rate of fire spread and flame length were observed on six prescribed headfires in the sagebrush (Artemisia)/bunchgrass vegetation type in western North America. Spread rate and flame length predictions from the fire behavior prediction system BEHAVE...

Person: Bushey
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire spread in wildland fuels is modeled as the steady, longitudinal propagation of an isothermal surface at ignition temperature by the process of radiation transport through a uniform layer of randomly-distributed, thermally-thin, radiometrically-...

Person: Albini
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Updating the National Fire-Danger Rating System (NFDRS) was completed in 1977, and operational use of it was begun the next year. The System provides a guide to wildfire control and suppression by its indexes that measure the relative potential of...

Person: Cohen, Deeming
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Weather data from Upsala and Atikokan, Ontario, were used to determine the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index System values and to calculate the soil moisture for two soil types using the Thornthwaite water balance. The Duff Moisture Code and the...

Person: McAlpine, Eiber
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The objective of this paper is to explain the distributions, assumptions, interpretations, and relationships of the two compatible, stochastic models of fire history: the negative exponential and the Weibull. For each model the 'fire interval...

Person: Johnson, Van Wagner
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Chambers
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Postfire recovery of biomass and soil organic pools was measured in a sequence of 10 subarctic lichen woodlands aged from 0 to 140 years. Less than one-tenth of total live biomasss combusted at the time of burning. Aboveground biomass combustion of...

Person: Auclair
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Thomas, Wein
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Van Lear, Waldrop
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Evaluations of fire management programs have been based primarily on ecological criteria rather than on cost-effectiveness. Determining cost-effectiveness poses several problems: current budgeting practices do not encourage such evaluations, assessment...

Person: Lotan, Kilgore, Fischer, Mutch, Agee
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS