Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 73

Editorial comment ... 'In this wide-ranging essay, Stephen Pyne, the preeminent historian of wildfire around the world, explores the past, present, and future of the term 'wildland-urban interface' and the policies regarding fire in that...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'It will take more than mere science to deal with the wildland-urban interface issue, argues the author. In addition, what is needed are the 'skills, talents, and approaches' of historians and the long perspective...

Person: Limerick
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Conclusions (p.222) ... 'Given the uncertainties regarding future climatic conditions and fire regimes, fire management techniques should be developed that avoid transporting or facilitating the movement of nonnative plant propagules...

Person: Zouhar, Smith, Sutherland, Brooks, Anzinger, Radosevich
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'The trend of increasing wildfire intensity and size likely due to increasing fuel hazards is only one consequence of fire suppression. Another legacy of the fire exclusion paradigm has far reaching implications: an...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Knowledge of the ecological effect of wildfire is important to resource managers, especially from forests in which past anthropogenic influences, e.g., fire suppression and timber harvesting, have been limited. Changes to forest structure and...

Person: Stephens, Fry, Franco-Vizcaino
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Uncertainty is a dominant feature of decision making in forestry and wildlife management. Aggravating this challenge is the irreversibility of some decisions, resulting in the loss of economic opportunities or the extirpation of wildlife populations....

Person: Morgan, Ben, Lasserre
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A temperate peatland located in the St. Lawrence lowlands (Southern Quebec) was studied in order to specify the past influence of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on its postglacial development. Seven profiles were analysed for pollen,...

Person: Muller, Richard, Talon
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests...

Person: Slik, Bernard, van Beek, Breman, Eichhorn
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The northern Temiscamingue region (western Quebec) sustained regional-scale pulses of natural disturbances during the 1850-2000 period, such as severe fires during the 1908-1926 period, two severe spruce budworm outbreaks that occurred in 1909-1918 and...

Person: Bouchard, Kneeshaw, Bergeron
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Recent ecosystem and fire management research aims to quantify, model and understand historical fire disturbances focusing on their frequency, size and distribution. Less attention, however, has been paid to fire boundaries and their location on the...

Person: Jordan, Fortin, Lertzman
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS