Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 25

Large fire years in which >1% of the landscape burns are becoming more frequent in the Alaskan (USA) interior, with four large fire years in the past 10 years, and 79 000 km2 (17% of the region) burned since 2000. We modeled fire severity conditions...

Person: Barrett, McGuire, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire frequency is expected to increase due to climate warming in many areas, particularly the boreal forests. An increase in fire frequency may have important effects on the global carbon cycle by decreasing the size of boreal carbon stores. Our...

Person: Brown, Johnstone
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Tundra fires have important ecological impacts on vegetation, wildlife, permafrost, and carbon cycling, but the pattern and controls of historic tundra fire regimes are poorly understood. We use sediment records from four lakes to develop a 2000-yr...

Person: Higuera, Chipman, Barnes, Urban, Hu
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The ratios of observed organic carbon (OC) to elemental carbon (EC) from the rural sites of the IMPROVE network are analyzed for the 5-year period from 2000 to 2004. Among these years, nationwide OC/EC peaks are observed most consistently in the summer...

Person: Zeng, Wang
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Steep decline in forest fires about a century ago occurred in coniferous forests over large areas in North America and Fennoscandia. This poorly understood phenomenon has been explained by different factors in different regions. The objective of this...

Person: Wallenius
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the boreal forest of North America, as in any fire-prone biome, three environmental factors must coincide for a wildfire to occur: an ignition source, flammable vegetation, and weather that is conducive to fire. Despite recent advances, the relative...

Person: Parisien, Parks, Krawchuk, Flannigan, Bowman, Moritz
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Welcome to the new era of 'megafires,' which rage with such intensity that no human force can put them out. Their main causes, climate change and fire suppression, are fueling a heated debate about how to stop them....

Person: Glick
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A number of nondestructive techniques for analyzing the timing, frequency, and magnitude of natural disturbances in forest stands are discussed in this paper. Intensive age determination of trees is desirable for reconstructing forest disturbance...

Person: Lorimer
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Ritchie
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Payette, Gagnon
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS