Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 23

Community workshops are widely used tools for collaborative research on social-ecological resilience in indigenous communities. Although results have been reported in many publications, few have reflected explicitly on the workshop itself, and...

Person: Huntington, Trainor, Natcher, Huntington, DeWilde, Chapin
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used a terrestrial ecosystem process model, BIOME-BGC, to investigate historical climate change and fire disturbance effects on regional carbon and water budgets within a 357,500 km2 portion of the Canadian boreal forest. Historical patterns of...

Person: Kang, Kimball, Running
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire can lead to considerable hydrological and geomorphological change, both directly by weathering bedrock surfaces and changing soil structure and properties, and indirectly through the effects of changes to the soil and vegetation on...

Person: Shakesby, Doerr
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We report measurements and analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects of greenhouse gases, aerosols, black carbon deposition on snow and sea ice, and postfire changes in surface albedo. The net effect of all agents was to increase...

Person: Randerson, Liu, Flanner, Chambers, Jin, Hess, Pfister, Mack, Treseder, Welp, Chapin, Harden, Goulden, Lyons, Neff, Schuur, Zender
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We used dendrochronological methods to construct three fire history chronologies in the interior of the Boston Mountains of Arkansas from 281 dated fire scars identified on 86 shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata) remnants and trees. We describe and contrast...

Person: Guyette, Spetich, Stambaugh
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fire occurrence is affected by multiple controls that operate at local to regional scales. At the spatial scale of forest stands, regional climatic controls may be obscured by local controls (e.g., stochastic ignitions, topography, and fuel...

Person: Gavin, Hu, Lertzman, Corbett
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The basic unit of the forest-tundra landscape is a toposequence extending from a wet, forested valley to a xeric, deforested hilltop; the contact zone between these two environments being called a subarctic tree line. Dendrochronological analysis of...

Person: Asselin, Payette
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A number of nondestructive techniques for analyzing the timing, frequency, and magnitude of natural disturbances in forest stands are discussed in this paper. Intensive age determination of trees is desirable for reconstructing forest disturbance...

Person: Lorimer
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Ritchie
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Payette, Gagnon
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS