Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 16

Raging wildfires have devastated vast areas of California and Australia in recent years, and predictions are that we will see more of the same in coming years as a result of climate change. But this is nothing new. Since the dawn of life on land, large...

Person: Scott
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire is the dominant ecological disturbance process in boreal forests (coniferous forests consisting mostly of pines, spruces, and larches) and fire frequency, size and severity are increasing in Alaska owing to climate warming. However, interactions...

Person: Falke, Gray
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

The combination of frequent droughts, changing climate conditions, and longer fire seasons along with urban development expansion into wildland areas has resulted in more difficult conditions for managing wildfires. Wildfires are causing more frequent...

Person: Schoennagel, Godwin, Miller
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Guest Lecture for OSU fierylabs.

Person: Taylor
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Alaska experiences extremely variable and increasingly active wildland fire seasons, with 6.6 million acres burned in 2004 and 5.1 million in 2015 respectively. The majority of acres burn in relatively brief periods of extremely warm and dry weather....

Person: Fisher, White, Thoman
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

In recent years a number of studies have suggested that trends in wildfire can be seen at a regional, national and global scale, and can be explained by interactions with factors such as anthropogenic activity and climate. As future susceptibility to...

Person: Hawthorne, Mitchell
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change is drastically altering global fire regimes, which may affect the structure and function of insect communities. Insect responses to fire are strongly tied to fire history, plant responses, and changes in species interactions. Many...

Person: Koltz, Burkle, Pressler, Dell, Vidal, Richards, Murphy
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change data - and future projections of related impacts - are crucial to community planners, land managers, and indeed all the people of Alaska. We depend on the landscape and its resources, and that landscape is changing. But raw data, even if...

Person: Fresco
Year: 2018
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'Two maps for each of the four seasons reveal sharp contrasts in the amount of rainfall received in various parts of the United States in wet seasons. Two other maps for each season show the percentage of the seasons which...

Person: Visher
Year: 1950
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A number of nondestructive techniques for analyzing the timing, frequency, and magnitude of natural disturbances in forest stands are discussed in this paper. Intensive age determination of trees is desirable for reconstructing forest disturbance...

Person: Lorimer
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS