Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests...

Person: Slik, Bernard, van Beek, Breman, Eichhorn
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The cumulative impacts of human and natural activity on forest landscapes in Alberta are clear. Human activity, such as forestry and oil and gas development, and natural processes such as wildfire leave distinctive marks on the composition, age class...

Person: Yamasaki, Duchesneau, Doyon, Russell, Gooding
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Pollen and high-resolution charcoal records from the north-western USA provide an opportunity to examine the linkages among fire, climate, and fuels on multiple temporal and spatial scales. The data suggest that general charcoal levels were low in the...

Person: Whitlock, Marlon, Briles, Brunelle, Long, Bartlein
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Alluvial fan deposits are widespread and preserve millennial-length records of fire. We used these records to examine changes in fire regimes over the last 2000 years in Yellowstone National Park mixed-conifer forests and drier central Idaho ponderosa...

Person: Pierce, Meyer
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We inferred climate drivers of 20th Century years with regionally synchronous forest fires in the U. S. Northern Rockies. We derived annual fire extent from an existing fire atlas that includes 5038 fire polygons recorded from 12 070 086 ha, or 71% of...

Person: Morgan, Heyerdahl, Gibson
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Payette, Gagnon
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

(1) The pattern of post-fire vegetation development in Picea mariana (black spruce)-Pleurozium forests in south-eastern Labrador, Canada, is evaluated using palaeoecological methods and vegetation analysis of extant stands.(2) Macrofossil analysis of...

Person: Foster
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Understanding feedbacks between terrestrial and atmospheric systems is vital for predicting the consequences of global change, particularly in the rapidly changing Arctic. Fire is a key process in this context, but the consequences of altered fire...

Person: Higuera, Brubaker, Anderson, Brown, Kennedy, Hu
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

ANNOTATION: This paper looks into the carbon sequestering abilities of forests and finds that policies currently in place promote avoidable carbon releases and discourage actions that would actually increase long-term carbon storage. When stand-...

Person: Hurteau, Koch, Hungate
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We conducted this investigation in response to criticisms that the current Alaska Interagency Fire Management Plans are allowing too much of the landscape in interior Alaska to burn annually. To address this issue, we analyzed fire history patterns...

Person: Drury, Grissom
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS