Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 11 - 20 of 54

Most people familiar with the Weeks Act of 1911 associate it with the establishment of national forests in the Eastern United States. However, the Weeks Act did more for eastern forest conservation than fund the purchase of private forest lands by the...

Person: Southard
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Like many of us at the Forest Service, I started my career in fire, and I have always relied on Smokey Bear. Fire prevention is part of our cultural DNA.

Person: Christiansen
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A review of weather factors important to predicting tundra fire spread from a study by NOAA Hollings Scholar James White of Ohio State University.

Person: White
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

If the fire has characteristics that do not fit the historical fire regime with which the fire-adapted ecosystem has developed, then it may impact resilience and cause a shift in ecosystem characteristics.

Person: Keeley, Witter, van Mantgem
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We’ve spent 100 years growing a tinderbox across the West. Now it's wildfire season. Controlled burning - an indigenous tradition that's been used for millennia - might be a solution.

Person:
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Paleofire studies frequently discount the impact of human activities in past fire regimes. Globally, we know that a common pattern of anthropogenic burning regimes is to burn many small patches at high frequency, thereby generating landscape...

Person: Roos, Williamson, Bowman
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire is an important disturbance to Arctic tundra ecosystems. In the coming decades, tundra fire frequency, intensity, and extent are projected to increase because of anthropogenic climate change. To more accurately predict the effects of climate...

Person: Sae-Lim, Russell, Vachula, Holmes, Mann, Schade, Natali
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Earth has experienced large changes in global and regional climates over the past one million years. Understanding processes and feedbacks that control those past environmental changes is of great interest for better understanding the nature,...

Person: Daniau, Desprat, Aleman, Bremond, Davis, Fletcher, Marlon, Marquer, Montade, Morales-Molino, Naughton, Rius, Urrego
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There is wide agreement that prescribed fire is essential and under-utilized for restoring and maintaining natural ecosystem function, sustaining native wildlife populations, and mitigating wildfire hazard. There is less agreement on the history of...

Person: Robertson
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Fire is a necessary ecosystem process in many biomes and is best viewed as a natural disturbance that is beneficial to ecosystem functioning. However, increasingly, we are seeing human interference in fire regimes that alters the historical range of...

Person: Keeley, Pausas
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES