Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Editorial comment ... 'The trend of increasing wildfire intensity and size likely due to increasing fuel hazards is only one consequence of fire suppression. Another legacy of the fire exclusion paradigm has far reaching implications: an...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Knowledge of the ecological effect of wildfire is important to resource managers, especially from forests in which past anthropogenic influences, e.g., fire suppression and timber harvesting, have been limited. Changes to forest structure and...

Person: Stephens, Fry, Franco-Vizcaino
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Uncertainty is a dominant feature of decision making in forestry and wildlife management. Aggravating this challenge is the irreversibility of some decisions, resulting in the loss of economic opportunities or the extirpation of wildlife populations....

Person: Morgan, Ben, Lasserre
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests...

Person: Slik, Bernard, van Beek, Breman, Eichhorn
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The northern Temiscamingue region (western Quebec) sustained regional-scale pulses of natural disturbances during the 1850-2000 period, such as severe fires during the 1908-1926 period, two severe spruce budworm outbreaks that occurred in 1909-1918 and...

Person: Bouchard, Kneeshaw, Bergeron
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In boreal forests of eastern Canada, the end of the little ice age (ca. 1850) coincided with a lengthening of mean fire return intervals, which has been hypothesized to increase the abundance of late-successional forests dominated by balsam fir. This...

Person: Bouchard, Pothier
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fire size distribution (FSD) is one of the suite of indicators of forest fire regimes. It is applied in forest fire management, particularly for planning and evaluating suppression efforts. It is also used in forest management in the context of...

Person: Cui, Perera
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There has been considerable interest in the recent literature regarding the assessment of post-fire effects on forested areas within the North American boreal forest. Assessing the physical and ecological effects of fire in boreal forests has far-...

Person: French, Kasischke, Hall, Murphy, Verbyla, Hoy, Allen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

North American jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) stands are generally characterized by an even-aged structure resulting from high intensity fires (HIF). However, non-lethal fires of moderate intensity (MIF), which leave behind surviving trees, have...

Person: Smirnova, Bergeron, Brais
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The cumulative impacts of human and natural activity on forest landscapes in Alberta are clear. Human activity, such as forestry and oil and gas development, and natural processes such as wildfire leave distinctive marks on the composition, age class...

Person: Yamasaki, Duchesneau, Doyon, Russell, Gooding
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS