Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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[1] Wildfire is a common occurrence in ecosystems of northern high latitudes, and changes in the fire regime of this region have consequences for carbon feedbacks to the climate system. To improve our understanding of how wildfire influences carbon...

Person: Balshi, McGuire, Zhuang, Melillo, Kicklighter, Kasischke, Wirth, Flannigan, Harden, Clein, Burnside, McAllister, Kurz, Apps, Shvidenko
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An algorithm for wildfire occurrence is introduced for incorporation into a numerical model of drainage basin evolution. Within the model, fire return intervals are determined using a stochastic rule set and fire sizes are assigned according to a...

Person: Martin
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'In this wide-ranging essay, Stephen Pyne, the preeminent historian of wildfire around the world, explores the past, present, and future of the term 'wildland-urban interface' and the policies regarding fire in that...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire use as a concept had its origin when humans first gained the ability to suppress fires. Some fires were suppressed and others were allowed to burn based on human values and objectives. Native Americans and Euro-American settlers fought...

Person: van Wagtendonk
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'It will take more than mere science to deal with the wildland-urban interface issue, argues the author. In addition, what is needed are the 'skills, talents, and approaches' of historians and the long perspective...

Person: Limerick
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'What better way to learn about fire ecology than to allow fires to burn during their own season, at their own pace, and without interference from humans? The strategy known as wildland fire use (WFU) does just that, and is being...

Person: Miller
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Editorial comment ... 'The trend of increasing wildfire intensity and size likely due to increasing fuel hazards is only one consequence of fire suppression. Another legacy of the fire exclusion paradigm has far reaching implications: an...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the Conclusions (p.222) ... 'Given the uncertainties regarding future climatic conditions and fire regimes, fire management techniques should be developed that avoid transporting or facilitating the movement of nonnative plant propagules...

Person: Zouhar, Smith, Sutherland, Brooks, Anzinger, Radosevich
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Knowledge of the ecological effect of wildfire is important to resource managers, especially from forests in which past anthropogenic influences, e.g., fire suppression and timber harvesting, have been limited. Changes to forest structure and...

Person: Stephens, Fry, Franco-Vizcaino
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Uncertainty is a dominant feature of decision making in forestry and wildlife management. Aggravating this challenge is the irreversibility of some decisions, resulting in the loss of economic opportunities or the extirpation of wildlife populations....

Person: Morgan, Ben, Lasserre
Year: 2008
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS