Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Like all forests, oak forests are continually responding to disturbances originating from both within and outside the forest. Oaks (Quercus spp.) owe their very existence to disturbance. In this context, silvicultural and other management practices can...

Person: Spetich, Johnson
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Of the many disturbance factors that shaped hardwood forests in the eastern United States, fire was perhaps the most important. Fires ignited by Native Americans and lightning played a dominant role in sustaining oak (Quercus spp.) forests throughout...

Person: Spetich, Van Lear
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Communities of the central hardwood forest have been dominated primarily by oak and hickory for the past 5000 years. Over this time period, they have become keystone species within the ecosystem and are of major importance in maintaining biodiversity....

Person: Spetich, Fralish
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Ignitions, fuels, topography, and climate interact through time to create temporal and spatial differences in the frequency of fire, which, in turn, affects ecosystem structure and function. In many ecosystems non-human ignitions are overwhelmed by...

Person: Spetich, Guyette, Dey
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS