Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 124

Climate and disturbance regimes are expected to change profoundly in 21st century forests. Whether and where forests may succumb to projected trends and shift to different ecosystem states is poorly resolved but essential for anticipating both...

Person: Hansen
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Analyses of bulk petrographic data indicate that during the Late Paleozoic wildfires were more prevalent than at present. We propose that the development of fire systems through this interval was controlled predominantly by the elevated atmospheric...

Person: Glasspool, Scott, Waltham, Pronina, Shao
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire frequency, extent, and size exhibit a strong linkage with climate conditions and play a vital role in the climate system. Previous studies have shown that the frequency of large fires in the western United States increased significantly since the...

Person: Yang, Tian, Tao, Ren, Pan, Liu, Wang
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'One of the smokejumper program's defining characteristics is its commitment to innovation--a constant refinement of equipment and techniques that hearkens back to the program's earliest days.'

Person: Bramwell
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Analyses to identify and relate trends in wildfire activity to factors such as climate, population, land use or land cover and wildland fire policy are increasingly popular in the United States. There is a wealth of US wildfire activity data available...

Person: Short
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The albedo change caused by fires and the subsequent succession is spatially heterogeneous, leading to the need to assess the spatiotemporal variation of surface shortwave forcing (SSF) as a component to quantify the climate impacts of high-latitude...

Person: Huang, Dahal, Liu, Jin, Young, Li, Liu
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Anthropogenic climate change has altered many ecosystem processes in the Arctic tundra and may have resulted in unprecedented fire activity. Evaluating the significance of recent fires requires knowledge from the paleofire record because observational...

Person: Chipman, Hudspith, Higuera, Duffy, Kelly, Oswald, Hu
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This article reviews social science research on Indigenous wildfire management in Australia, Canada and the United States after the year 2000 and explores future research needs in the field. In these three countries, social science research exploring...

Person: Christianson
Year: 2015
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

A 1977 tundra fire burned a hillslope where prefire soils and vegetation ranged from poorly drained moist tussock-shrub tundra on the lower slopes to well-drained dwarf shrub tundra on the back slope and very poorly drained wet sedge meadow on the flat...

Person: Racine, Jandt, Meyers, Dennis
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'LANDFIRE can give more precise predictions than previous fire-behavior models did, allowing land managers to let beneficial fires burn, Shlisky says.The database has been tested in the northern Rockies and in central Utah; now...

Person: Ferber
Year: 2004
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS