Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 107

Here, in one concise book, is the essential story of fire. Noted environmental historian Stephen J. Pyne describes the evolution of fire through prehistoric and historic times down to the present, examining contemporary attitudes from a long-range,...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[1] Wildfire is a common occurrence in ecosystems of northern high latitudes, and changes in the fire regime of this region have consequences for carbon feedbacks to the climate system. To improve our understanding of how wildfire influences carbon...

Person: Balshi, McGuire, Zhuang, Melillo, Kicklighter, Kasischke, Wirth, Flannigan, Harden, Clein, Burnside, McAllister, Kurz, Apps, Shvidenko
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An algorithm for wildfire occurrence is introduced for incorporation into a numerical model of drainage basin evolution. Within the model, fire return intervals are determined using a stochastic rule set and fire sizes are assigned according to a...

Person: Martin
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildland fire use as a concept had its origin when humans first gained the ability to suppress fires. Some fires were suppressed and others were allowed to burn based on human values and objectives. Native Americans and Euro-American settlers fought...

Person: van Wagtendonk
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'What better way to learn about fire ecology than to allow fires to burn during their own season, at their own pace, and without interference from humans? The strategy known as wildland fire use (WFU) does just that, and is being...

Person: Miller
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Wildfire has always been a periodic visitor to western forests, part of the cycle of natural dynamics that make these forests what they are. Until recently, the standard explanation for increased wildfires in recent decades has...

Person: Wells
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Anyone who has not lived in 'Indian country' cannot understand just how extensively the United States government and its laws affect Native Americans and their natural resource management. These effects are sobering, and touch upon sensitive...

Person: Yazzie
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

For at least two decades, expansion of low-density residential development at the wildland-urban interface has been widely recognized as a primary factor influencing the management of US national forests. We estimate the location, extent, and trends in...

Person: Theobald, Romme
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aboveground biomass is a key variable in understanding the role of tropical forests in the global carbon cycle. The forests of the Yucatan Peninsula form part of the largest remaining tract of Mesoamerican forests, where the predominant land use is...

Person: Urquiza-Haas, Dolman, Peres
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Aim Temporal variability of annual area burned in Canada (AAB-Can) from (AD) 1781 to 1982 is inferred from tree-ring width data. Next, correlation analysis is applied between the AAB-Can estimates and Northern Hemisphere (NH) warm season land...

Person: Girardin
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS