Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Alaska's Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) is one of the warmest parts of the Arctic tundra biome and tundra fires are common in its upland areas. Here, we combine field measurements, Landsat observations, and quantitative cover maps for tundra plant...

Person: Frost, Loehman, Saperstein, Macander, Nelson, Paradis, Natali
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Extensive burning of Arctic tundra landscapes in recent years has contradicted the conventional view that fire is a rare, spatially limited disturbance in tundra. These fires have been identified as harbingers of climate change, despite our limited...

Person: Vachula, Sae-Lim, Russell
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Humanity’s fire practices are creating the fire equivalent of an ice age. Our shift from burning living landscapes to burning lithic ones is affecting all aspects of Earth.

Person: Pyne
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the text (p.15) ... 'I promised I would try to define silviculture, but maybe we need reminding again that 'because of the broad differences in climate, physiography, forest vegetation, method of past treatment, natural and introduced...

Person: Mustian
Year: 1975
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'Fused inorganic tubes caused by lightning strokes to the ground, called fulgurites, are abundant in many portions of the earth. Ample evidence of fossil fires, called fusain, lies buried in the coal beds of all the coal-forming...

Person: Pyne, Pyne
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'It is often assumed that the American Indian was incapable of greatly modifying his environment and that he would not have been much interested in doing so if he did have the capabilities. In fact, he possessed both the tool and...

Person: Pyne, Pyne
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'But with the advent of fire protection in the South, game birds decreased much as pasturage had and as grouse populations had in Britain. The vegetative ensemble that sustained maximum populations gave way to roughage and woods....

Person: Pyne, Pyne
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'The outcome of the Southern Forestry Education Campaign was much less devisive. To begin with, its subject was not the internal distribution of agency funds but the promotion of fire protection as a concept. Nor was it concerned...

Person: Pyne, Pyne
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire occurs at various intervals in differnet vegetation types. Intervals between fires are longer in warm, dry sites where small amount of fuel limits fire spread and in cool, wet sites where burning conditions are limiting despite the large amount of...

Person: Means, Martin
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text: 'With respect to traditional uses of fire, the Indians of northern Alberta exhibited a clear understanding of both what was happening as well as why things happened. They exhibited full understanding of systemic, relational effects...

Person: Lewis
Year: 1982
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS