Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 86

Preliminary list of fire research needs in Alaska.

Person: Barnes
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

America does not have a fire problem. It has many fire problems. The policy of fire exclusion through most of the 20th century seemed successful at first but eventually lead to larger, more intense, and damaging fires. By the mid-1970s federal agencies...

Person: Pyne
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

From the text ... 'Because fire was such an important historic disturbance and is a large component in understanding regional differences in emissions, it is analogous to an elephant in the closet. One can think of fire frequency as the elephant....

Person: Robertson, Galley, Masters, Guyette
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Over the past several decades, high-resolution sediment-charcoal records have been increasingly used to reconstruct local fire history. Data analysis methods usually involve a decomposition that detrends a charcoal series and then applies a threshold...

Person: Higuera, Gavin, Bartlein, Hallett
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

With the emergence of a new forest management paradigm based on the emulation of natural disturbance regimes, interest in fire-related studies has increased in the boreal forest management community. A key issue in this regard is the improvement of our...

Person: Girardin, Ali, Hély
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Tree species rarely exposed to burning, like in everwet tropical forests, are unlikely to be fire adapted. Therefore, one could hypothesize that these species are affected equally by burning and that tree abundance changes are linked solely to fire...

Person: Slik, Breman, Bernard, van Beek, Cannon, Eichhorn, Sidiyasa
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the eastern boreal forest of Quebec, Canada, harvesting strategies try to mimic the effects of fire on forest ecosystems, assuming that both disturbances have similar impacts. However impacts of both types of perturbations on lacustrine ecosystems,...

Person: Tremblay, Larocque-Tobler, Sirois
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Determination of the direct causal factors controlling wildfires is key to understanding wildfire-vegetation-climate dynamics in a changing climate and for developing sustainable management strategies for biodiversity conservation and maintenance of...

Person: Senici, Chen, Bergeron, Cyr
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this paper, we present how elders of Pikangikum First Nation in northwestern Ontario have drawn upon their knowledge and values associated with fire to engage in fire management planning for 1.3 million hectares of their traditional boreal forest...

Person: Miller, Davidson-Hunt, Peters
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire-scarred trees provide a deep temporal record of historical fire activity, but identifying the mechanisms therein that controlled landscape fire patterns is not straightforward. We use a spatially correlated metric for fire co-occurrence between...

Person: Kennedy, McKenzie
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS