Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 47

From the text (p.15) ... 'I promised I would try to define silviculture, but maybe we need reminding again that 'because of the broad differences in climate, physiography, forest vegetation, method of past treatment, natural and introduced...

Person: Mustian
Year: 1975
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

As the initial step in a study of forest fire cycles in the boreal forest of northwestern Ontario, four burned areas of different ages were briefly examined. This Report describes the present condition of the areas visited in terms of both forest cover...

Person: Methven, Van Wagner, Stocks
Year: 1975
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text... 'The data in these tables and in the two additional tables listing "near-fatal” fires (Tables 3 and 4) help demystify these related fire types. It is possible to identify some common denominators of fire behavior in both...

Person: Wilson
Year: 1977
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed fire has traditionally been used to create and maintain Elk habitat in the Tuchodi River area of northeastern British Columbia. Elk use of post fire vegetation was examined. Elk wintered primarily on younger postburn vegetation dominated by...

Person: Peck, Peek
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

People are responsible for starting two out of every three forest fires in Canada. To efficiently suppress these fires while they are still small, a modern forest fire control organization must be able to predict their numbers and locations one day in...

Person: Todd, Kourtz
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Fuchs
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Hartigan
Year: 1977
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Computers are rapidly expanding into the urban fire safety area. This paper presents some social implications caused by the use of computers for fire safety databases, arson prediction programs, and fire simulation programs. In regards to the new...

Person: Nodvin, Waldrop, Davi
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Carrow
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Stand ages and fire scars were used to piece together the histories of stand-replacing conflagrations and noncatastrophic fires, respectively, in a 1500-hectare area east of Lesser Slave Lake, Alberta, Canada. The overall distribution of stand ages in...

Person: Hermann, Ross, Smith, O'Brien
Year: 1991
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS