Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 7 of 7

Wildfire can lead to considerable hydrological and geomorphological change, both directly by weathering bedrock surfaces and changing soil structure and properties, and indirectly through the effects of changes to the soil and vegetation on...

Person: Shakesby, Doerr
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Pollen, plant macrofossil and charcoal analyses of sediments from two Alaskan lakes provide new data for inferring Lateglacial and Holocene environmental change. The records span the past 14,700 years at Lost Lake, 240 m a.s.l., central Alaska, north...

Person: Tinner, Hu, Beer, Kaltenrieder, Scheurer, Krahenbuhl
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest fire occurrence is affected by multiple controls that operate at local to regional scales. At the spatial scale of forest stands, regional climatic controls may be obscured by local controls (e.g., stochastic ignitions, topography, and fuel...

Person: Gavin, Hu, Lertzman, Corbett
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Thompson, Simard, Titman
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Payette, Gagnon
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Pollen, plant macrofossil and charcoal analyses of sediments from two Alaskan lakes provide new data for inferring Lateglacial and Holocene environmental change. The records span the past 14,700 years at Lost Lake, 240 m a.s.l., central Alaska, north...

Person: Tinner, Hu, Beer, Kaltenrieder, Scheurer, Krahenbuhl
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The presence of over 429,000 ha of forest with spruce (Picea spp.) recently killed by spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis) on the Kenai Peninsula has raised the specter of catastrophic wildfire. Dendrochronological evidence indicated that spruce...

Person: Berg, Anderson
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS