Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 13

From the text (p.25) ... 'If we are interested in all fires (agricultural, rangeland, wildland, prescribed and private), we need to tease apart the potential error in reporting and the best way to use satellite data to define area burned.'...

Person: Soja, Al-Saadi, Pouliot, Kittaka, Zhang, Raffuse, Wiedinmyer
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Abrupt forest disturbances generating gaps >0.001 km2 impact roughly 0.4-0.7 million km2 a-1. Fire, windstorms, logging, and shifting cultivation are dominant disturbances; minor contributors are land conversion, flooding, landslides, and avalanches...

Person: Frolking, Palace, Clark, Chambers, Shugart, Hurtt
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Yield curves are traditionally constructed with mean age of dominant trees as the temporal variable. However. When tree longevity is shorter than the average period of time between two successive disturbances. Mean age of dominant trees becomes a...

Person: Garet, Pothier, Bouchard
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

LANDFIRE is a 5-year, multipartner project producing consistent and comprehensive maps and data describing vegetation, wildland fuel, fire regimes and ecological departure from historical conditions across the United States. It is a shared project...

Person: Rollins
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

South-east Asia's tropical rainforests are experiencing the highest rate of deforestation worldwide and fire is one of the most important drivers of forest loss and subsequent carbon dioxide emissions. In this study, we analyzed all fire events in...

Person: Langner, Siegert
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Forest harvesting strategies that approximate natural disturbances have been proposed as a means of maintaining natural species' diversity and richness in the boreal forests of North America. Natural disturbances impact shoreline forests and...

Person: Kardynal, Hobson, Van Wilgenburg, Morissette
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A number of nondestructive techniques for analyzing the timing, frequency, and magnitude of natural disturbances in forest stands are discussed in this paper. Intensive age determination of trees is desirable for reconstructing forest disturbance...

Person: Lorimer
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Racine, Dennis, Patterson
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Human-induced vegetation fires destroy a large amount of biomass each year and thus constitute an important fraction of the human interference with the energy flows of terrestrial ecosystems. This paper presents a quantification of the biomass burned...

Person: Lauk, Erb
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Large-scale ecosystem disturbances (LSEDs) have major impacts on the global carbon cycle as large pulses of CO2 and other trace gases from terrestrial biomass loss are emitted to the atmosphere during disturbance events. The high temporal and spatial...

Person: Mildrexler, Zhao, Running
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES