Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: McKenzie
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text...'Changing fire regimes have important implications for the health and function of ecosystems. Forest ecosystems change when fires are less frequent and more severe. The density of trees increases and fuels accumulate. More shade-...

Person: Boula, Morgan, Bunting
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire on the Earth today looks the way it does because of the expansion of Europe, first as an imperial power, then as the vector for industrialization. The 'suppression' paradigm characteristic of Europe's frontiers derived from the...

Person: Pruden, Brennan, Pyne
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The importance of large fire events in shaping the structure and composition of subalpine forests has recently gained a great deal of attention from resource managers. High elevation forests dominated by Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) and...

Person: Pruden, Brennan, Farris, Neuenschwander, Boudreau
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is now apparent that fire once played a role in shaping all but the wettest, the most arid, or the most fire-sheltered plant communities of the United States. Understanding the role of fire in structuring vegetation is critical for land management...

Person: Pruden, Brennan, Frost
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A number of nondestructive techniques for analyzing the timing, frequency, and magnitude of natural disturbances in forest stands are discussed in this paper. Intensive age determination of trees is desirable for reconstructing forest disturbance...

Person: Lorimer
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Racine, Dennis, Patterson
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Analyses of more than 40 years of climatic data reveal intriguing spatial variations in climatic patterns for Beringia (North-eastern Siberia and Alaska), aiding the understanding of the hierarchy of climatic controls that operate at different spatial...

Person: Mock, Bartlein, Anderson
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

ANNOTATION: Wildland fire has been an integral part of the landscape of the conterminous United States for millennia. Analysis of contemporary and pre-industrial (~ 200 - 500 yr BP) conditions, using potential natural vegetation, satellite imagery, and...

Person: Leenhouts
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Despite increasing temperatures since the end of the Little Ice Age (ca. 1850), wildfire frequency has decreased as shown in many field studies from North America and Europe. We believe that global warming since 1850 may have triggered decreases in...

Person: Flannigan, Bergeron, Engelmark, Wotton
Year: 1998
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS