Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Person: Lardner, Wright, Cohen, Curry, MacFarlane
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Updating the National Fire-Danger Rating System (NFDRS) was completed in 1977, and operational use of it was begun the next year. The System provides a guide to wildfire control and suppression by its indexes that measure the relative potential of...

Person: Cohen, Deeming
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Cohen
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Updating the National Fire-Danger Rating System (NFDRS) was completed in 1977, and operational use of it was begun the next year. The System provides a guide to wildfire control and suppression by its indexes that measure the relative potential of...

Person: Cohen, Deeming
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This 25-minute video features Fire Scientist Jack Cohen showing examples of homes that were unprotected during a wildfire; homes using Home Protection Guidelines (see below); and examples where home protection guidelines can be put to use.

Person: Cohen
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Residential losses associated with wildland fires have become a serious international fire protection problem. The radiant heat flux from burning vegetation adjacent to a structure is a principal ignition factor. A thermal radiation and ignition model...

Person: Cohen, Butler
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Research results indicate that the home and its immediate surroundings within 100-200 feet (30-60 meters) principally determines the home ignition potential during severe wildland-urban fires. Research has also established that fire is an intrinsic...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Safety zones are a primary component of firefighter safety. A theoretical study has been presented suggesting burn injury can be avoided if safety zones provide a minimum separation distance between the fire and the firefighter equal to 4 times the...

Person: Butler, Cohen
Year: 2001
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES