Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 11

Smoke from fire is a local, regional and often international issue that is growing in complexity as competition for airshed resources increases. BlueSky is a smoke modeling framework designed to help address this problem by enabling simulations of the...

Person: Larkin, O'Neill, Solomon, Raffuse, Strand, Sullivan, Krull, Rorig, Peterson, Ferguson
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We developed multiple regression models and tree-based (CART -- classification and regression tree) models to predict fire return intervals across the Interior Columbia River basin at 1-km resolution, using geo-referenced fire history potential...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, McKenzie, Peterson, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Group decision making is becoming increasingly important in natural resource management and associated scientific applications, because multiple values are treated coincidentally in time and space, multiple resource specialists are needed, and multiple...

Person: Schmoldt, Peterson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This report summarizes the science of climate change and the impacts of climate change on the United States, now and in the future. It is largely based on results of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and integrates those results with...

Person: Karl, Melillo, Peterson
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Information in this short course summarizes the state-of-the science for natural resource managers and decisionmakers regarding climate variability, change, climate projections, and ecological and management responses to climate variability. The...

Person: Furniss, Millar, Peterson, Joyce, Neilson, Halofsky, Kerns
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study explores potential adaptation approaches in planning and management that the United States Forest Service might adopt to help achieve its goals and objectives in the face of climate change. Availability of information, vulnerability of...

Person: Joyce, Blate, McNulty, Millar, Moser, Neilson, Peterson
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change is already affecting forests and other ecosystems, and additional, potentially more severe impacts are expected (IPCC, 2007; CCSP, 2008a, 2008b). As a result, forest managers are seeking practical guidance on how to adapt their current...

Person: Blate, Joyce, Littell, McNulty, Millar, Moser, Neilson, O'Halloran, Peterson
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This synthesis provides an ecological foundation for management of the diverse ecosystems and fire regimes of North America based on scientific principles of fire interactions with vegetation, fuels, and biophysical processes. Although a large amount...

Person: Keeley, Aplet, Christensen, Conard, Johnson, Omi, Peterson, Swetnam
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A warmer climate in western North America will likely affect forests directly through soil moisture stress and indirectly through increased extent and severity of disturbances. We propose that stress complexes, combinations of biotic and abiotic...

Person: Bytnerowicz, Arbaugh, Riebau, Andersen, McKenzie, Peterson, Littell
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Timber harvest following wildfire leads to different outcomes depending on the biophysical setting of the forest, pattern of burn severity, operational aspects of tree removal, and other management activities. Fire effects range from relatively minor,...

Person: Peterson, Agee, Aplet, Dykstra, Graham, Lehmkuhl, Pilliod, Potts, Powers, Stuart
Year: 2009
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES