Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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We developed multiple regression models and tree-based (CART -- classification and regression tree) models to predict fire return intervals across the Interior Columbia River basin at 1-km resolution, using geo-referenced fire history potential...

Person: Neuenschwander, Ryan, Gollberg, McKenzie, Peterson, Agee
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Group decision making is becoming increasingly important in natural resource management and associated scientific applications, because multiple values are treated coincidentally in time and space, multiple resource specialists are needed, and multiple...

Person: Schmoldt, Peterson
Year: 2000
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There is relatively little scientific understanding of mixed severity fire regimes, compared to low severity fire regimes. However, mixed severity regimes widespread in the United States, and ecology and fuel treatments must be considered in the...

Person: Peterson, Agee, Decker
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

ANNOTATION: In order to accomplish complex and multiple management objectives related to forest structure, fuels, and fire disturbance, these two disciplines must be effectively integrated in science and practice. The authors have linked scientific and...

Person: Johnson, Peterson
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Many biological, hydrological, and geological processes are interactively linked in ecosystems. These ecological phenomena normally vary within bounded ranges, but rapid, nonlinear changes to markedly different conditions can be triggered by even small...

Person: Burkett, Wilcox, Stottlemyer, Barrow, Fagre, Baron, Price, Nielsen, Allen, Peterson, Ruggerone, Doyle
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Wildfire represents one of the most beneficial, yet destructive, forms of disturbance in the western United States. Wildfire danger is a product of weather, fuels and terrain, varying seasonally depending on changes in the amount and condition of fuels...

Person: Roberts, Peterson, Dennison, Rechel, van Wagtendonk
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Donoghue, Martin, Peterson
Year: 1985
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

We propose to expand the Northwest Fire Research Clearinghouse (FIREHouse) to include projects relevant specifically to fire management in Alaska. FIREHouse was originally funded by the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) in 2003 (project number 03-4-2-...

Person: Olson, Olson, Peterson, Carlino, Barnes
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Guide to Fuel Treatments analyzes a range of potential silvicultural thinnings and surface fuel treatments for 25 representative dry-forest stands in the Western United States. The guide provides quantitative guidelines and visualization for...

Person: Peterson
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Many fire-dependent forests today are denser, contain fewer large trees, have higher fuel loads, and greater fuel continuity than occurred under historical fire regimes. These conditions increase the probability of unnaturally severe wildfires....

Person: Peterson, Maguire, Youngblood, Metlen, Knapp, Outcalt, Stephens, Waldrop, Yaussy
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES