Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 14

We used tree ring data (AD 1601-2007) to examine the occurrence of and climatic influences on spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreaks in south-central and southwest Alaska and found evidence of regional-scale outbreaks dating from the mid-...

Person: Sherriff, Berg, Miller
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The conditions that allow a wildland fire to hold over the winter in the duff until spring are poorly known. After a smoke report on 9 May 2011 within the area burned by the 2010 Willow Creek Fire, I was able to investigate. The fire originated near...

Person: Miller
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Demand for alternative energy sources has led to increased interest in intensive biomass production. When applied across a broad spatial extent, intensive biomass production in forests, which support a large proportion of biodiversity, may alter...

Person: Verschuyl, Riffell, Miller, Wigley
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Use of scaling terminology and concepts in ecology evolved rapidly from rare occurrences in the early 1980s to a central idea by the early 1990s (Allen and Hoekstra 1992; Levin 1992; Peterson and Parker 1998). In landscape ecology, use of 'scale...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk, McKenzie, Kennedy
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Planning and management for the expected effects of climate change on natural resources are just now beginning in the western United States (U.S.), where the majority of public lands are located. Federal and state agencies have been slow to address...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk, Peterson, Halofsky, Johnson
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Federally designated wilderness areas of the United States are to be managed so that natural ecological processes such as fire and other disturbances can function without human interference. Consistent with this intent, policy and law support the...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk, Miller, Abatzoglou, Brown, Syphard
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Global warming is expected to change fire regimes, likely increasing the severity and extent of wildfires in many ecosystems around the world. What will be the landscape-scale effects of these altered fire regimes? Within what theoretical contexts can...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Global climate is expected to change rapidly over the next century (Thompson et al. 1998; Houghton et al. 2001; IPCC 2008). This will affect forest ecosystems both directly by altering biophysical conditions (Neilson 1995; Neilson and Drapek 1998;...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk, Cushman, Wasserman, McGarigal
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The landscape ecology of fire analyzes the causes of spatial and temporal patterns of fire severity, frequency, and size and the effects of these patterns on vegetation succession, seed and animal dispersal, species turnover, and other disturbances...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk, McKenzie, Miller, Falk
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Here we synthesize the previous 11 chapters and provide a brief look into the future of landscape ecology of fire research. We speculate briefly on the implications for policy and management of fire in a rapidly changing climate. Section I gives us a...

Person: McKenzie, Miller, Falk, McKenzie, Miller, Falk
Year: 2011
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES