Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 279

Wildfires can destroy property and vegetation, thereby threatening people’s livelihoods and food security. Soil moisture and biomass are important determinants of wildfire hazard. Corresponding novel satellite-based observations therefore present an...

Person: O, Hou, Orth
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Vegetation fires are an essential component of the Earth system but can also cause substantial economic losses, severe air pollution, human mortality and environmental damage. Contemporary fire regimes are increasingly impacted by human activities and...

Person: Bowman, Kolden, Abatzoglou, Johnston, Van der Werf, Flannigan
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Carbon (C) emissions from wildfires are a key terrestrial–atmosphere interaction that influences global atmospheric composition and climate. Positive feedbacks between climate warming and boreal wildfires are predicted based on top-down controls of...

Person: Walker, Rogers, Veraverbeke, Johnstone, Baltzer, Barrett, Bourgeau-Chavez, Day, de Groot, Dieleman, Goetz, Hoy, Jenkins, Kane, Parisien, Potter, Schuur, Turetsky, Whitman, Mack
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire has been a source of global biodiversity for millions of years. However, interactions with anthropogenic drivers such as climate change, land use, and invasive species are changing the nature of fire activity and its impacts. We review how such...

Person: Kelly, Giljohann, Duane, Aquilué, Archibald, Batllori, Bennett, Buckland, Canelles, Clarke, Fortin, Hermoso, Herrando, Keane, Lake, McCarthy, Morán-Ordoñez, Parr, Pausas, Penman, Regos, Rumpff, Santos, Smith, Syphard, Tingley, Brotons
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Background Predictive models of post-fire tree and stem mortality are vital for management planning and understanding fire effects. Post-fire tree and stem mortality have been traditionally modeled as a simple empirical function of tree defenses (e.g...

Person: Cansler, Hood, van Mantgem, Varner
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Most bat species depend on forests for roosting, foraging, and drinking during part or all of their life cycles. Many of the world’s forests are managed using a variety of silvicultural treatments and, over the past 40 years, researchers have studied...

Person: Loeb
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We tested whether post-fire seedling establishment of common boreal tree and expanding shrub species at treeline and in Arctic tundra is facilitated by co-migration of boreal forest mycorrhizal fungi. Wildfires are anticipated to facilitate biome...

Person: Hewitt, Chapin, Hollingsworth, Mack, Rocha, Taylor
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Increases in fire frequency, extent, and severity are expected to strongly impact the structure and function of boreal forest ecosystems. An important function of the boreal forest is its ability to sequester and store carbon (C). Increasing...

Person: Walker, Baltzer, Bourgeau-Chavez, Day, Dieleman, Johnstone, Kane, Rogers, Turetsky, Veraverbeke, Mack
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Temperate and boreal forests are increasingly suffering from anthropic degradation. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) are symbionts with most temperate and boreal forest trees, providing their hosts with soil nutrients and water in exchange for plant carbon...

Person: Policelli, Horton, Hudon, Patterson, Bhatnagar
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In frequent‐fire forests, wildland fire acts as a self‐ regulating process creating forest structures that consist of a fine‐grained mosaic of isolated trees, tree groups of various sizes, and non‐treed openings. Though the self‐regulation of forest...

Person: Ritter, Hoffman, Battaglia, Stevens-Rumann, Mell
Year: 2020
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES