Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 195

Alaska Fire Science Consortium Workshop | Thursday, October 13, 2016
Presenter: Tyler Lewis

Person: Lewis
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Alaska Fire Science Consortium Workshop | Thursday, October 13, 2016
Presenter: Amy Breen

Person: Breen
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

We synthesize insights from current understanding of drought impacts at stand-to-biogeographic scales, including management options, and we identify challenges to be addressed with new research. Large stand-level shifts underway in western forests...

Person: Clark, Iverson, Woodall, Allen, Bell, Bragg, D'Amato, Davis, Hersh, Ibanez, Jackson, Matthews, Pederson, Peters, Schwartz, Waring, Zimmermann
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) in the western Canadian Arctic is experiencing environmental changes that affect subsistence harvesting practices and are of concern to local communities. In order to assess the impacts of multiple disturbances on...

Person: Tyson, Lantz, Ban
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Much recent research has investigated the effects of burning on mature black spruce (Picea mariana) forests in interior Alaska, however little research has focused on how frequent reburning affects soil organic layer (SOL) vulnerability in these...

Person: Hoy, Turetsky, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Questions: How does fire severity, measured as depth of burn of ground layer fuels, control the regeneration of understorey species across black spruce-dominated stands varying in pre-fire organic layer depths? Are successional shifts from evergreen to...

Person: Gibson, Turetsky, Cottenie, Kane, Houle, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Landscape fires can produce large quantities of smoke that degrade air quality in both remote and urban communities. Smoke from these fires is a complex mixture of fine particulate matter and gases, exposure to which is associated with increased...

Person: Barn, Elliott, Allen, Kosatsky, Rideout, Henderson
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated by forest fires has been associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes, including exacerbation of respiratory diseases and increased risk of mortality. Due to the unpredictable nature of forest fires...

Person: Yuchi, Yao, Mclean, Stull, Paviovic, Davignon, Moran, Henderson
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire, a dominant disturbance in boreal forests, is highly variable in occurrence and behavior at multiple spatiotemporal scales. New data sets provide more detailed spatial and temporal observations of active fires and the post-burn environment in...

Person: Barrett, Loboda, McGuire, Genet, Hoy, Kasischke
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfires are a common disturbance event in the Canadian boreal forest. Within event boundaries, the level of vegetation mortality varies greatly. Understanding where surviving vegetation occurs within fire events and how this relates to pre-fire...

Person: Ferster, Eskelson, Andison, LeMay
Year: 2016
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS