Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Presented by Heidi Strader, Randi Jandt, Jenn Jenkins, Alison York and Robert Ziel. Optional webinar for AFSC remote sensing workshop presenters to introduce the Alaska fire management context. We will summarize the natural history of fire in the state...

Person: Strader, Jandt, Jenkins, York, Ziel
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

From the Spring 2017 AFSC Remote Sensing Workshop: Opportunities to Apply Remote Sensing in Boreal/Arctic Wildfire Management and Science.

Person: Loehman
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Statistical models using historical observations are a critical tool for anticipating future fire regimes. A key uncertainty with these models is the ability to project outside the range of historical observations, often done when making future...

Person: Young, Higuera, Abatzoglou, Duffy, Hu
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Climate change has increased the occurrence, severity, and impact of disturbances on forested ecosystems worldwide, resulting in a need to identify factors that contribute to an ecosystem's resilience or capacity to recover from disturbance....

Person: Walker, Mack, Johnstone
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prescribed fire is widely accepted as a conservation tool because fire is essential to the maintenance of native biodiversity in many terrestrial communities. Approaches to this land-management technique vary greatly among continents, and sharing...

Person: Freeman, Kobziar, Rose, Cropper
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire and the threat it poses to society represents an example of the complex, dynamic relationship between social and ecological systems. Increasingly, wildfire adaptation is posited as a pathway to shift the approach to fire from a suppression...

Person: Brenkert-Smith, Meldrum, Champ, Barth
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The economic and ecological costs of wildfire in the United States have risen substantially in recent decades. Although climate change has likely enabled a portion of the increase in wildfire activity, the direct role of people in increasing wildfire...

Person: Balch, Bradley, Abatzoglou, Nagy, Fusco, Mahood
Year: 2017
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper examines the distribution of areas burned in forest fires. Empirical size distributions, derived from extensive fire records, for six regions in North America are presented. While they show some commonalities, it appears that a simple power-...

Person: Reed, McKelvey
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Federal, state, tribal and local governments are making unprecedented efforts to reduce the buildup of fuels and restore forests and rangelands to healthy conditions. Yet, needless red tape and lawsuits delay effective...

Person:
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text (p.250) ... 'In addition to the materials reviewed by Williams in chapter 7, there are several ecological data sets that suggest aboriginal burning once accounted for most fires in the West, as well as in eastern forests. Brown et al...

Person: Kay, Simmons, Kay
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS