Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 1093

Presented for Lesson 30 of the S-590 Advanced Fire Behavior Interpretation Course at the National Advanced Resource Technology Center in Marana, Arizona, 5-17 March 2006.

Lesson Objectives:

  • Gather a cursory understanding of the...
Person: Alexander
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Presented for Lesson 31 of the S-590 Advanced Fire Behavior Interpretation Course at the National Advanced Resource Technology Center in Marana, Arizona, 10-22 March 2002.

Outline of Presentation:
I. CFFDRS Structure
II. Fire Weather...

Person: Alexander
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

This is a key note presentation by Michael Rains, presented at the Fire and Aquatic Ecosystem Workshop, held April 22-24, 2002 in Boise, Idaho. This presentation outlines the fundamental premise, long-term goals, key points, current and proposed...

Person: Rains
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Person: Elliot
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Website
Source: FRAMES

This article demonstrates the applicability of vector autoregression (VAR) modeling in probing the causality relationships among wildfire, El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), timber harvest, and urban sprawl in the U.S. The VAR approach allows for the...

Person: Gan
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

[1] Large lightning wildfires in Canada and Alaska account for most of the area burnt and are main determiners of the age mosaic of the landscape. Such fires occur when positive midtroposphere height anomalies persist > 10 days during the fire...

Person: Fauria, Johnson
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Wich is best: bury, burn or both? The extraordinary heterogeneity of the energy system makes it unlikely that any single solution will triumph everywhere. In practice, there will be no absolute dominance of any one strategy over...

Person: Keith, Rhodes
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Three different lattice-based models for antagonistic ecological interactions, both nonlinear and stochastic,exhibit similar power-law scalings in the geometry of clusters. Specifically, cluster size distributions andperimeter-area curves follow power-...

Person: Pascual, Roy, Guichard, Flierl
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Postfire development of cover and diversity was studied in an upland Picea mariana-dominated forest in theCanadian Subarctic. Short-term vegetation responses of 10- and 22-year-old cleared rights-of-way and a forest site were investigated two and three...

Person: Nowak, Kershaw, Kershaw
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This paper examines the distribution of areas burned in forest fires. Empirical size distributions, derived from extensive fire records, for six regions in North America are presented. While they show some commonalities, it appears that a simple power-...

Person: Reed, McKelvey
Year: 2002
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS