Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 261

The following list of fire research topics and questions were generated by personnel from agencies and organizations within AWFCG during 2014 Fall Fire Review and through other solicitations. The topics were initially ranked by the AWFCG Fire Research...

Person:
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This discussion included a project update including a basic overview, preliminary results on the efffects of fuel treatments on permafrost and fuel composition, the modeling framework, and products. They hope to simulate wildfire in response to...

Person: Rupp
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

What factors may influence new fires burning into or being slowed by previous fire scars? How long can we consider fire scars a fuel barrier? More and more area in Alaska seems to be burning in close succession, or "repeat burns."

Person: Barnes, Ziel
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Hearing about climate-driven plant community changes takes on new meaning when they name names of the passengers who might not be boarding the flight to the future. A recent paper by Hollingsworth et al. (2013) does just that, analyzing fire severity...

Person: Jandt
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Very large-fires (VLFs) have widespread impacts on ecosystems, air quality, fire suppression resources, and in many regions account for a majority of total area burned. Empirical generalized linear models of the largest fires (>5000 ha) across the...

Person: Barbero, Abatzoglou, Steel, Larkin
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Boreal soils in permafrost regions contain vast quantities of frozen organic material that is released to terrestrial and aquatic environments via subsurface flow paths as permafrost thaws. Longer flow paths may allow chemical reduction of solutes,...

Person: Koch, Kikuchi, Wickland, Schuster
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Wildfire, a recurrent disturbance in the boreal, converts part of the forest floor into pyrogenic carbon (PyC). The latter is an important component of the global soil carbon pool, yet knowledge of its stocks and storage mechanisms in these boreal...

Person: Soucemarianadin, Quideau, MacKenzie
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

As climate rapidly warms at high-latitudes, the boreal forest faces the simultaneous threats of increasing invasive plant abundances and increasing area burned by wildfire. Highly flammable and widespread black spruce (Picea mariana) forest represents...

Person: Spellman, Mulder, Hollingsworth
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Permafrost soils are large reservoirs of potentially labile carbon (C). Understanding the dynamics of C release from these soils requires us to account for the impact of wildfires, which are increasing in frequency as the climate changes. Boreal...

Person: Taş, Prestat, Mcfarland, Wickland, Knight, Berhe, Jorgenson, Waldrop, Jansson
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Fire severity is predicted to increase in boreal regions due to global warming. We hypothesized that these extreme events will alter regeneration patterns of black spruce (Picea mariana). To test this hypothesis, we monitored seed dispersal and...

Person: Tsuyuzaki, Narita, Sawada, Kushida
Year: 2014
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS