Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 143

From the text... 'This initial release of these Guidelines reflects the efforts of the Fire Management Task Force and subsequent review by park, regional and WASO staff. It represents the framework of the Service fire management program. The WASO...

Person:
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

An increase in the use of prescribed fire as a forest management tool is anticipated in Ontario where its use is viewed as a viable method of site preparation for regeneration purposes. Literature available on prescribed burning in the jack pine (Pinus...

Person: McRae
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Combustion of a forest fuel complex produces a diverse mixture of oxygenated and unsaturated hydrocarbon compounds mixed with aerosols. This study examines the production rates for a number of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) precursor compounds...

Person: Ward
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the introduction ... 'As a result of a 15,000-acre man-caused conflagration in north-central New Mexico and a previous data base prior to the fire, it was possible to examine delayed mortality as well as recovery of ponderosa pine stands two...

Person: Potter, Foxx
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

During summer 1977, wildfires burned extensive areas of maritime tundra in the Seward Peninsula. This study was initiated in July 1978 to determine the effects of these fires on tundra soils and vegetation and to establish permanent plots in which to...

Person: Racine
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A method is presented whereby the economic impact of a forest fire can be calculated, not just on the burned stand alone, but on the entire area under management. The main question is whether, when the burned area would have been ready for harvesting....

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Observations were made in a pure 70-yr-old Scots pine stand damaged by a medium-intensity ground fire in 1968. The ‘bioelectric potentials* of 391 damaged trees were measured at b.h. on 4 sides of the stem in 1969, 1970 and 1973, with a galvanometer...

Person: Korbut
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Natural disturbances have been traditionally defined in terms of major catastrophic events originating in the physical environment and, hence, have been regarded as exogenous agents of vegetation change. Problems with this view are: (1) there is a...

Person: White
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This report provides a set of Canadian forest fire statistics for the period 1961 to 1966. Data for 43,796 fires from every fire Control agency in Canada were processed and stored on magnetic tape. This report contains statistics on fire occurrence and...

Person: Simard, Graham, Young, Redmond
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Road construction and timber harvesting displace elk and grizzly bears at least temporarily. Elk sometimes accept logging disturbances, but usually do not return until harvesting ends. Increased contact between grizzly bears and humans is undesirable....

Person: Lyon, Basile
Year: 1979
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS