Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Use modern web-based geotechnologies to collect, map, spatially analyze, and explain the results of your work to others. These tools include Survey123, ArcGIS Online, Operations Dashboards, and story maps. Join geographer and educator Joseph Kerski for...

Person: Kerski
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

Wildland firefighting requires managers to make decisions in complex decision environments that hold many uncertainties; these decisions need to be adapted dynamically over time as fire behavior evolves. Models used in firefighting decisions should...

Person: Belval, Wei, Bevers
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The U.S. Geological Survey's Wildland Fire Science Program produces fundamental information to identify the causes of wildfires, understand the impacts and benefits of both wildfires and prescribed fires, and help prevent and manage larger,...

Person: Steblein, Miller, Soileau
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Purpose of Review: This review is on global wildland fire management research needs from the standpoint of 'integrated fire management'. It seeks to apply a characterisation of fires to frame research needs, and also recognise some differences in...

Person: Moore
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

During wildland fires, firebrands form once they break off of burning vegetation or structures. Many are then lofted into the fire plume where they are transported long distances ahead of the fire front, igniting new “spot” fires as they land. To date...

Person: Caton-Kerr, Tohidi, Gollner
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study aims to encourage the idea of utilizing unmanned aerial vehicles in the fire-fighting application. In this paper, we present a remote-controlled rotary-wing unmanned aerial vehicle made from metal alloys. This unmanned aerial vehicle, using...

Person: Soliman, Cagan, Buldum
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Trends in regional fire cycles for Alaska, 1943-2016, were analyzed by Thomas Paragi, Alaska Department of Fish & Game,  Maija Wehmas, Alaska Fire Science Consortium, and David Verbyla, University of Alaska Fairbanks

The methodology/figures/...

Person: Grabinski, Grabinski, Wehmas, Verbyla, Jandt, Paragi
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Generation of firebrands from various fuels has been well-studied in the past decade. Limited details have been released about the methodology for characterizing firebrands such as the proper sample size and the measurement process. This study focuses...

Person: Hedayati, Bahrani, Zhou, Quarles, Gorham
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Each year, fires in the wildland-urban interface (WUI)—the place where homes and wildlands meet or intermingle—have caused significant damage to communities. To contribute to firefighter and public safety by reducing the risk of structure ignition,...

Person: Takahashi
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A demonstration of the Landscape Burn Probability in IFTDSS.

Person: Noble, Anderson
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES