Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 9 of 9

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology has been used to model wind speed and direction in mountainous terrain at a relatively high resolution compared to other readily available technologies. The process termed "gridded wind"; is not a forecast...

Person: Butler, Forthofer, Finney, Bradshaw, Stratton
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

One of the many features of a spreading fire is the shape of the combustion interface. We hypothesize that the shape of the flame profile within burning fuel is key to fire propagation because it reflects the mechanisms of energy transfer to the...

Person: Yedinak, Forthofer, Cohen, Finney
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

There is currently no spatial wildfire spread and growth simulation model used commonly across New Zealand or Australia. Fire management decision-making would be enhanced through the use of spatial fire simulators. Various groups from around the world...

Person: Andrews, Butler, Opperman, Gould, Finney, Tymstra
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Description not entered.

Person: Leuders, Phipps, van Wagtendonk, Baldwin, Bevers, Finney, Haight
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The following constitutes a proposal submitted in response to JFSP RFP 2003-2 Task-i. One major source of uncertainty in fire behavior predictions is spatial variation in the wind fields used in the fire models. Mountainsides, valleys, ridges, and the...

Person: Finney, Bradshaw, Butler, Cook
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Project
Source: FRAMES

Modeling and experiments have suggested that spatial fuel treatment patterns can influence the movement of large fires. On simple theoretical landscapes consisting of two fuel types (treated and untreated) optimal patterns can be analytically derived...

Person: Andrews, Butler, Finney
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Computerized and manual systems for modeling wildland fire behavior have long been available (Rothermel 1983, Andrews 1986). These systems focus on one-dimensional behaviors and assume the fire geometry is a spreading line-fire (in contrast with point...

Person: Andrews, Butler, Finney
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

A new software tool has been developed to simulate surface wind speed and direction at the 100m to 300 m scale. This tool is useful when trying to estimate fire behavior in mountainous terrain. It is based on widely used computational fluid dynamics...

Person: Andrews, Butler, Butler, Finney, Bradshaw, Forthofer, McHugh, Stratton, Jimenez
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Historically the boreal forest has experienced major changes, and it remains a highly dynamic biome today. During cold phases of Quaternary climate cycles, forests were virtually absent from Alaska, and since the postglacial re-establishment of forests...

Person: Chapin, Oswood, Van Cleve, Viereck, Verbyla, Chapin, McGuire, Ruess, Walker, Boone, Edwards, Finney, Hinzman, Jones, Juday, Kasischke, Kielland, Lloyd, Oswood, Ping, Rexstad, Romanovsky, Schimel, Sparrow, Sveinbjörnsson, Valentine, Van Cleve, Verbyla, Viereck, Werner, Wurtz, Yarie
Year: 2006
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES