Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Year

Person

Displaying 51 - 60 of 116

[no description entered]

Person: Birch, Enrlich
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Sopper, Lull, Hibbert
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Training has always played an important role in the Forest Service's overall management program. ... Training personnel in the control and use of fire is not an easy task; it is, in fact, one of the most difficult because...

Person: Cooper
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

No abstract available.

Person: Komarek
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Hare
Year: 1961
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Extent and climate of botanical range, edaphic and physiographic site conditions, reproductive and growth habits, ecology, plant and animal pests, and response to management.

Person: Renshaw
Year: 1961
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Robinson
Year: 1944
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Chances for germination and early growth appear to be optimum between 27-32 degrees C. and at less than 5 atmospheres' moisture stress ©1967 The University of Chicago Press. Abstract reproduced by permission.

Person: Farmer, Bonner
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Cutting shallow trenches with a bulldozer or giant plow achieves the three requisites for natural regeneration of cottonwood: a bare seedbed, removal of overstory other than seed trees, and freedom from weeds for at least a year.

Person: Johnson
Year: 1963
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Farmer, McKnight
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS