Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 31 - 40 of 617

From the text ... 'Only if the seed experiences an appropriate cue that informs it of a favourable current environment while (relatively) non-dormant will germination occur. Light confirms there has been some disturbance that has brought a buried...

Person: Thompson, Ooi
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'One way to protect the WUI is to restore surrounding landscapes to a healthy, resilient condition. Healthy, resilient forest ecosystems are less likely to see uncharacteristically severe wildfires that turn into human and...

Person: Tidwell, Brown
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In the eastern boreal forest of Quebec, Canada, harvesting strategies try to mimic the effects of fire on forest ecosystems, assuming that both disturbances have similar impacts. However impacts of both types of perturbations on lacustrine ecosystems,...

Person: Tremblay, Larocque-Tobler, Sirois
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

As forest management scenarios become more complex, the ability to more accurately predict erosion from those scenarios becomes more important. In this second part of a two-part study we report model parameters based on 66 simulated runoff experiments...

Person: Wagenbrenner, Robichaud, Elliot
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Slash and burn agriculture is a traditional and predominant land use practice in Madagascar and its relevance in the context of forest preservation is significant. At the end of a cycle of culture, the fields become mostly weed covered and the soil...

Person: Raharimalala, Buttler, Ramohavelo, Razanaka, Sorg, Gobat
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From the text ... 'Smoldering fires, the slow, low-temperature, flameless form of combustion, are an important phenomena in the Earth system, and the most persistent type of combustion. The most important fuels involved in smoldering fires are...

Person: Revkin, Rein
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Determination of the direct causal factors controlling wildfires is key to understanding wildfire-vegetation-climate dynamics in a changing climate and for developing sustainable management strategies for biodiversity conservation and maintenance of...

Person: Senici, Chen, Bergeron, Cyr
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Carbon (C) in the forest floor (FF) of the boreal region is an important reservoir of terrestrial C. We examined the effects of stand age and disturbance type (clearcutting vs. wildfire) on quantity and quality of organic C of FF in a boreal mixedwood...

Person: Shrestha, Chen
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this paper, we present how elders of Pikangikum First Nation in northwestern Ontario have drawn upon their knowledge and values associated with fire to engage in fire management planning for 1.3 million hectares of their traditional boreal forest...

Person: Miller, Davidson-Hunt, Peters
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Although slugs (Mollusca: Gastropoda) are known to be important generalist herbivores, fungivores, and detrivores in a variety of ecosystems, little is known about their abundance and diversity in protected areas. Likewise, the presence of non-native...

Person: Moss, Hermanutz
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS