Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

Filter Results

Year

Person

Displaying 1 - 10 of 44

From the text (p.1) ... 'The Forest Service of the Department of the Interior has long recognized forest protection as one of the important problems facing the people of this country. Scientific methods of increasing forest wealth can avail little...

Person: Wright
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Foliar moisture content was sampled in five eastern Canadian conifers and two hardwoods during 1962-65, and seasonal trends were estabished. These were basically similar from year to year despite weather differences. The moisture content of new conifer...

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1967
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

This review, based on information from 169 references, analyzes the problem presented by logging slash, and its importance. It discusses eight factors which affect the slash hazard, and describes nine methods to abate it. Legislation governing the...

Person: Bennett
Year: 1960
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

From tabulated frequency distributions of fire danger indexes for a nationwide network of 89 stations, the probabilities of four types of fire behavior ranging from 'fire out' to 'critical' were calculated for each month and are...

Person: Schroeder, Chandler
Year: 1966
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

A series of three 4—acre plots in a jack pine cut over were burned at three degrees of fire hazard. The weather, fire behaviour, and effects are reported, and a general conclusion drawn by others was confirmed: slash hazard is reduced by any running...

Person: Van Wagner
Year: 1966
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Thomas
Year: 1960
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

'The smoke generated when wood is heated in air contains a considerable range of compounds resulting from the distillation and degradation of celluloses, lignins, resins and tannins. Visible particles which are formed when the smoke cools appear...

Person: Foster
Year: 1960
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

It is generally recognized that logging slash, by increasing the concentration of forest fuels, creates a high forest fire hazard. The most severe fire hazard is found on clearcuts where fuels are usually continuous and exposed to the dessicating...

Person: Kiil
Year: 1966
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

[no description entered]

Person: Kowal
Year: 1966
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The effective use of modeling techniques in the study of free-burning fires requires more knowledge of the essential scaling laws than has hitherto been available. These laws are developed for a stationary area or 'mass' fire by the methods...

Person: Byram
Year: 1966
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS