Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 410

Climate change and associated ecological impacts have challenged many conventional, observation-based approaches for predicting ecosystem and landscape responses to natural resource management. Complex spatial ecological models provide powerful,...

Person: Keane, Loehman, Holsinger
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire management around the world is now undergoing extensive review, with a move toward fire management plans that maintain biodiversity and other ecosystems services, while at the same time mitigating the negative impacts to people and property. There...

Person: Gillson, Whitlock, Humphrey
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Since 1973, the National Silviculture Workshop has provided a forum for USDA Forest Service managers and scientists to deliberate on management topics, issues, or challenges that reflect the progression of Federal forest management in the United States...

Person: Jain
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Background: Asthma-related outcomes are regularly used by studies to investigate the association between human exposure to landscape fire smoke and health. Robust summary effect estimates are required to inform health protection policy for fire smoke...

Person: Borchers-Arriagada, Horsley, Palmer, Morgan, Tham, Johnston
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Government officials, health professionals, and other decision makers are tasked with characterizing vulnerability and understanding how populations experience risks associated with exposure to climate-related hazards. Spatial analyses of vulnerable...

Person: Schmeltz, Marcotullio
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Under projected patterns of climate change, models predict an increase in wildland fire activity in Alaska, which is likely to strain the capacity of the fire governance system under current arrangements. The Alaska wildland fire governance system...

Person: Schultz, Duffy, Rutherford, Jandt, Fresco
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Direct flame contact, radiant heat, and burning firebrands (or embers) have been identified as three principal ways that cause fire spread in the wildland and Wildland-Urban Interface (WUI). However, only burning firebrands can initiate a new spot fire...

Person: Zhou, Quarles, Weise
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This slow-motion video shows a match igniting the gaseous molecules that were produced through pyrolysis.

Person:
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Media
Source: FRAMES

As a pervasive disturbance agent operating at many spatial and temporal scales, wildland fre is a key abiotic factor affecting forest health both positively and negatively. In some ecosystems, for example, wildland fres have been essential for...

Person: Potter, Conkling, Potter
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The annual national report of the Forest Health Monitoring (FHM) program of the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, presents forest health status and trends from a national or multi-State regional perspective using a variety of sources,...

Person: Potter, Conkling
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES