Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 440

Wildfires in the boreal forests and peatlands of the ABoVE domain are a natural disturbance agent, but are increasing in frequency and severity. Boreal forest fires impart relatively large forcings on the climate system as a result of (i) typically...

Person: Rogers, Cooperdock, Dieleman, Erb, Goetz, Johnstone, Mack, Moubarak, Phillips, Potter, Randerson, Schaaf, Solvik, Turetsky, Veraverbeke, Walker, Wiggins
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

At three locations in the ABoVE domain in-situ data loggers have been installed since summer 2017 to obtain time series data on soil moisture and temperature across a variety of land cover types, including tundra, boreal peatlands, and boreal uplands....

Person: Bourgeau-Chavez, Jenkins, Hart, French, Poley, Tanzer, Bosse, McDonald
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Our study aimed to integrate remote sensing, spatial analysis, and field data to understand the vulnerability and resiliency of peatlands and uplands to wildfire across the southern Northwest Territories study area where peatlands are abundant,...

Person: Bourgeau-Chavez, Graham, Battaglia, Kane, French, Grelik, Krezek-Hanes
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Our goal was to improve understanding of the interactions of wildfire and hydrology (including permafrost changes) and the ensuing post-fire successional trajectories in both uplands and peatlands of the Artic-Boreal Zone (ABZ) in a changing climate....

Person: Bourgeau-Chavez, French, Battaglia, Billmire, Kane, Shuman, Swenson, Siqueira, Chapman, Krezek-Hanes, Cantin, Whitman, Berg, Foster, Baltzer
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The changing role of fire in forest landscapes shows that strategic forest management is necessary to safeguard urban water supplies.

Person: Hallema, Kinoshita, Martin, Robinne, Galleguillos, McNulty, Sun, Singh, Mordecai, Moore
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

We use a value of information (VOI) approach to demonstrate the cost effectiveness of using satellite imagery as part of Burn Area Emergency Response (BAER), a federal program that identifies imminent post-wildfire threats to human life and safety,...

Person: Bernknopf, Kuwayama, Gibson, Blakely, Mabee, Clifford, Quayle, Epting, Hardy, Goodrich
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

ince the 1990s, USDA Forest Service employees and leaders have taken steps to improve the agency's safety record (USDA Forest Service 2018), resulting in a declining number of fatalities since 2010. Yet wildland firefighter entrapments have persisted (...

Person: Brown
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

In the last 50 years, Federal fire policy has undergone tremendous change. Some people (including the author) can still remember when the goal of wildland firefighting was simple: put out every fire by 10 a.m. on the morning after it was first detected...

Person: Brown
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Effective leadership of wildland fire operations requires paying careful attention to the fire itself and to relationships both internal and external to the incident. At the center of the action is the incident commander (IC), who must integrate her or...

Person: Black, Boyatzis, Thiel, Rochford
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The culture of the USDA Forest Service has been shaped by the maxim 'Certainly it can be done' (Pinchot 1947), borrowed from the Coast Guard by the agency's first Chief, Gifford Pinchot (1905-10). From the moment employees joined the Forest Service...

Person: Brown
Year: 2019
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES