Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 48

Anyone who has not lived in 'Indian country' cannot understand just how extensively the United States government and its laws affect Native Americans and their natural resource management. These effects are sobering, and touch upon sensitive...

Person: Yazzie
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Increasing densities of small diameter trees have changed ecological processes and negatively impacted conservation of soil and water resources in western forests. Thinning treatments are commonplace to reduce stein density and potential fire hazard....

Person: Cram, Baker, Fernald, Madrid, Rummer
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

There is no one-size-fits-all approach to managing frequent-fire, old-growth forests. However, there are general guidelines to follow: 1) set objectives for both structure (tree density, diameter distribution, tree species composition, spatial...

Person: Fiedler, Friederici, Petruncio, Denton, Hacker
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

In this article, we discuss how to monitor the structural and functional attributes of old growth, as well as its associated plant communities and wildlife, both to determine the possible need for treatment and to assess post-treatment progress toward...

Person: Fiedler, Friederici, Petruncio
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Old growth in the frequent-fire conifer forests of the western United States, such as those containing ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi), giant sequoia (Sequioa giganteum) and other species, has undergone major changes since...

Person: Abella, Covington, Fulé, Lentile, Sánchez Meador , Morgan
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Classic ecological concepts and forestry language regarding old growth are not well suited to frequent-fire landscapes. In frequent-fire, old-growth landscapes, there is a symbiotic relationship between the trees, the understory graminoids, and fire...

Person: Binkley, Sisk, Chambers, Springer, Block
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Altered fire regimes are a serious threat to biodiversity in almost every major habitat type on earth. Threats to the restoration and maintenance of intact fire regimes (e.g., federal and state fire policies, land use, social values, global plant...

Person: Masters, Galley, Shlisky, Hickey, Bragg
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Pines (genus Pinus) form the dominant tree cover over large parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Human activities have affected the distribution, composition, and structure of pine forests for millennia. Different human-mediated factors have affected...

Person: Richardson, Rundel, Jackson, Teskey, Aronson, Bytnerowicz, Wingfield, Proches
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fate of private lands is widely seen as key to the fate of biodiversity in much of the world. Organizations that work to protect biodiversity on private lands often hope that conservation actions on one piece of land will leverage the actions of...

Person: McDonald, Yuan-Farrell, Fievet, Moeller, Kareiva, Foster, Gragson, Kinzig, Kuby, Redman
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

Prior to proceeding with large-scale fire reintroduction as a grassland management option, appropriate fire frequencies need to be determined. This research experimentally tested the effects of dormant-season fire on ground cover and on plant and soil...

Person: Masters, Galley, Ford, White
Year: 2007
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS