Alaska Reference Database

The Alaska Reference Database originated as the standalone Alaska Fire Effects Reference Database, a ProCite reference database maintained by former BLM-Alaska Fire Service Fire Ecologist Randi Jandt. It was expanded under a Joint Fire Science Program grant for the FIREHouse project (The Northwest and Alaska Fire Research Clearinghouse). It is now maintained by the Alaska Fire Science Consortium and FRAMES, and is hosted through the FRAMES Resource Catalog. The database provides a listing of fire research publications relevant to Alaska and a venue for sharing unpublished agency reports and works in progress that are not normally found in the published literature.

 

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Displaying 1 - 10 of 10

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

We analyze detailed atmospheric gas/aerosol composition data acquired during the 2008 NASA ARCTAS (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites) airborne campaign performed at high northern latitudes in spring (...

Person: Singh, Anderson, Brune, Cai, Cohen, Crawford, Cubison, Czech, Emmons, Fuelberg, Huey, Jacob, Jimenez, Kaduwela, Kondo, Mao, Olson, Sachse, Vay, Weinheimer, Wennberg, Wisthaler
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: TTRS

The fire destruction of hundreds of homes associated with wildfires has occurred in the United States for more than a century. From 1870 to 1920, massive wildfires occurred principally in the Lake States but also elsewhere. Wildfires such as Peshtigo (...

Person: Cohen
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Many fuel beds, especially live vegetation canopies (conifer forests, shrub fields, bunch-grasses) contain gaps between vegetation clumps. Fires burning in these fuel types often display thresholds for spread that are observed to depend on...

Person: Finney, Cohen, Grenfell, Yedinak
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

Extreme weather often contributes to crown fires, where the fire spreads from one tree crown to the next as a series of piloted ignitions. An important aspect in predicting crown fires is understanding the ignition of fuel particles. The ignition...

Person: McAllister, Finney, Cohen
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Fire spread through a fuel bed produces an observable curved combustion interface. This shape has been schematically represented largely without consideration for fire spread processes. The shape and dynamics of the flame profile within the fuel bed...

Person: Yedinak, Cohen, Forthofer, Finney
Year: 2010
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES, TTRS

This publication is designed to help you minimize the risks of losing your home from wildfire. The first step is to understand wildife and how homes are destroyed. Next, consider the fire resistiveness of your house and the surrounding landscape, and...

Person: Barkley, Schnepf, Cohen
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

Ecosystem structure and function are strongly affected by disturbance events, many of which in North America are associated with seasonal temperature extremes, wildfires, and tropical storms. This study was conducted to evaluate patterns in a 19-year...

Person: Potter, Ping-Ning, Kumar, Kucharik, Klooster, Genovese, Cohen, Healey
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

This study compared aspatial and spatial methods of using remote sensing and field data to predict maximum growing season leaf area index (LAI) maps in a boreal forest in Manitoba, Canada. The methods tested were orthogonal regression analysis (reduced...

Person: Berterretche, Hudak, Cohen, Maiersperger, Gower, Dungan
Year: 2005
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES

The wildland-urban interface (W-UI) refers to residential areas surrounded by or adjacent to wildland areas. In recent years, significant W-UI residential fire losses have occurred nationwide in the United States that have focused attention on the...

Person: Cohen, Saveland
Year: 1997
Resource Group: Document
Source: FRAMES